Video - Project Half Double Unfolded (Part 1)

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Session 1: Kick off and the global agenda: Why do we need to rethink project management? (Niels Ahrengot, Michael Ehlers and Dr. Aaron Shenhar)

Transcript - Project Half Double Unfolded (Part 1)


00:08 -you have just heard one of the biggest

00:10

paradigm shifts within pop music in the

00:14

1960s the Beatles changed the music

00:17

industry completely it's a remarkable

00:21

story about how for British guys

00:23

inspired by rock and roll from America

00:25

started playing their own music and

00:28

changed the way we think about pop music

00:30

today first of all no one really wrote

00:34

their own songs back then and secondly

00:37

it was a new way of playing music never

00:41

heard before

00:42

to put it shortly it was a radical

00:45

rethinking and they produced two new

00:48

albums each year from 1963 to 1969 so

00:54

this is actually the Beatles version of

00:56

a half-double they created a huge impact

00:59

and I'm just gonna need some help to

01:01

change the slide here there it is they

01:06

created a huge impact in just six years

01:09

so what they did was they inspired a new

01:13

generations of musicians to start

01:15

writing their own music which was the

01:18

main driver for doubling the music

01:20

industry from 1960 to 1970 secondly they

01:26

were the first band on earth to use

01:28

their superstar status to do good so now

01:31

45 years later the war is over campaign

01:36

is still running it's pretty remarkable

01:38

thinking that this is just a pop band

01:41

from so many years ago we want to do the

01:45

same thing for projects we want to

01:48

create huge impact with relatively

01:50

simple but very effective means and

01:53

that's the reason why we're all here

01:56

today my name is Michael eller's I'm the

02:00

project manager of project half-double

02:01

and I'm from implement Consulting Group

02:04

who have been working for the last 10

02:05

years now it's time to for you guys to

02:09

introduce each other we just need to

02:13

gonna take the other one the most slim

02:16

version but it works so way I would like

02:21

you to introduce yourself to the person

02:23

right next to you or close to you so who

02:26

are you and why are you here today so

02:29

I'm gonna give you three minutes to do

02:31

that

02:42

there will be a lot more interaction

02:45

later but I would like to introduce the

02:48

first speaker today it is Nils Arrancar

02:51

who's the founding father of the project

02:53

half-double together with christina sia

02:55

pillars from lentement unipeg so so Nels

03:00

is acting as the active project owner of

03:03

project half-double and as you know

03:05

that's a very important role in a

03:07

half-double perspective so without an

03:10

active project owner the project is

03:12

never going to succeed in the way that

03:14

we hope it will succeed so that's why

03:16

Anil's has a very important role besides

03:18

that Nils is also the managing partner

03:20

of implement Consulting Group where

03:22

we're about 500 consultants working with

03:24

different projects and and all that so

03:27

we've been working with projects for a

03:28

long time and Mills has a very strong

03:31

passion for projects which makes him a

03:33

very good project owner Mills machine is

03:36

yours thank you can you give me all of

03:40

you yeah this number is actually the

03:46

outset of this journey because even

03:50

though we've been working for the last

03:53

30 years on truly improving the product

03:59

environments in almost all types of

04:03

organizations around Scandinavia and it

04:08

has become a lot better but this number

04:11

is still in this range meaning that only

04:15

about one-third of all projects that we

04:20

set out for are actually perceived as a

04:23

success when you will evaluate them so

04:27

this is this is this is the problem this

04:31

is why we here we want to do something

04:34

about that and because there's reason

04:41

for that the problem is that oh let me

04:44

see if this work yeah it does because

04:47

this this number is actually a challenge

04:49

for our whole economy in the Western

04:52

world

04:54

if imagine that we are back in the

04:58

heydays of the Beatles in the 60s and

05:01

you are right now located on the

05:05

northern part of else where tempest has

05:10

its headquarters and you are back in the

05:14

1960s you're standing outside of them of

05:18

the main building and you see people

05:20

coming in in the morning and you will at

05:26

that point in time see around 90 to 95%

05:31

of the people coming into the building

05:33

wearing blue a walls doing a operations

05:41

job if you go down today and I it's

05:49

actually you know I could exercise to do

05:51

standing outside of the building

05:54

watching who's actually who's arriving

05:57

then you will see that the the amount of

06:01

people in blue walls have declined

06:05

dramatically so people are wearing

06:09

different types of clothes and people

06:13

are doing a different job they are doing

06:20

projects

06:23

so when we talk about improving the

06:27

whole Western economy we need to do

06:31

something about improving our ability to

06:34

do projects and for some reason this is

06:39

a really hard thing to communicate to

06:43

politicians actually to the whole

06:47

Western world this is what we try to do

06:51

so thank you for being here

06:54

yeah it's we simply need to do something

07:02

about this and in actually many of us in

07:10

this room has somehow embarked on this

07:15

journey and I think that's the reason

07:18

for that because I think a lot of you

07:20

people in this room I actually hear from

07:22

from Scandinavia and not that we think

07:26

we are better than others maybe some do

07:27

but I don't but one thing's for sure we

07:32

have some characteristics from our

07:37

heritage which I think can actually make

07:43

it easier for us try to somehow be a

07:47

spearhead and this in this journey we

07:51

have a very low power distance which is

07:54

a prerequisite for making this work we

07:59

are pretty highly educated which is also

08:05

important and then we have learned to

08:09

collaborate since we started in first

08:13

grade I was also me with my age I was

08:18

actually in first grade in 1966 when

08:22

beetles were you know playing the music

08:25

and already at that time I learned you

08:28

know group work etcetera that was in the

08:31

beginning of those days so I think we

08:34

had a special application

08:37

to make this happen and and I think you

08:42

know the whole idea of impact the impact

08:46

that week in this room can actually have

08:49

on the whole Western economy I know this

08:53

is dreaming but this is a big idea and

08:58

we need to do something about that so

09:01

thank you very much for being here and

09:06

and basically it's a it's simple sorry

09:12

it's simple it's about I mean it's it's

09:15

it is really simple because it's about

09:18

breaking the paradigm of how we think

09:20

about projects because the whole the

09:25

whole project knowledge base was

09:28

actually just the heart in the 50s and

09:30

the 60s Erin we'll come back to that and

09:34

the problem is that it was actually

09:36

started out in construction projects so

09:40

it's all based on contractual thinking

09:43

meaning that success is primarily a

09:48

matter of you know living up to your to

09:52

your obligations it's actually a matter

09:57

of predictability so you put your

10:01

ability to be predictable but this is

10:07

not what it's about it's not a

10:10

contractual thing it's about making

10:13

impact an impact is in the end measured

10:19

by one measure which is they call a

10:23

satisfaction and this is

10:27

this is this is the paradigm shift and

10:34

and you know the the sorry when we

10:41

didn't look into their through the

10:43

academic world it's interesting to to

10:46

see that this of course been reading

10:49

been writing a lot of articles about

10:52

project management and there's been a

10:55

lot of articles about you know how can

10:57

we actually rethink project management

11:00

but there are actually very few articles

11:06

about how to do it and that's the idea

11:10

of this journey to actually come out

11:14

with some simple tools to break this

11:20

paradigm that is the idea with product

11:24

half-double and and as you know those of

11:31

you who have been part of it which is

11:32

many of you it's it's simple it's it's

11:39

about creating another perspective on

11:45

leadership it's about which is this

11:50

figure it's about putting much more

11:54

effort into the people side of project

11:57

management meaning going from a matter

12:02

of system thinking to a mara of people

12:06

thinking it's people who actually change

12:08

the world it's not systems

12:12

it's about impact it's about having

12:21

relent

12:22

focus on impact instead of having

12:25

primary focus on deliverables and then

12:30

it's about flow it's about creating

12:34

short and fat projects making the

12:41

project move instead of optimizing

12:45

resources making the project move so so

12:52

in that sense it's really really simple

12:57

we also know that it's it's right

13:01

because a lot of these things think are

13:04

not something that has been invented you

13:06

know in the last year a lot of the

13:09

things here are topics that many of you

13:13

have worked on for years but our ability

13:19

to create this movement is based on the

13:25

fact that we can actually balance the

13:26

idea of being communicating this in a

13:29

very simple way and on the other hand

13:31

really see this working from a practical

13:37

point of view so this is this is the

13:40

idea and and obviously as we are talking

13:47

about impact we need to see this number

13:51

the 30% number change and this is the

13:57

ultimate impact that we are seeking at

14:01

to change that number to a completely

14:05

different number in your own

14:09

organizations you can choose your you

14:11

your number but but but I I think the

14:14

idea of half-double also would apply

14:18

here meaning that the 30 percent success

14:21

rate should be doubled in half the time

14:26

so this is this is this is what we try

14:30

to do and and and and our hope is of

14:33

course that

14:34

as many of us in this room can help

14:37

build this wave so to speak in our own

14:42

organizations because if we don't do it

14:45

ourselves I mean it doesn't make sense

14:46

so we use a lot of time on it in our own

14:50

organization I know you do the same and

14:53

and and then we build it from there and

14:56

to the benefit of our companies to the

14:58

benefit of our society to the benefit of

15:01

all of us so thank you very much for

15:03

being here and I'm really looking

15:05

forward to to see our thoughts and ideas

15:08

with you today thank you very much okay

15:18

so we have a small film we want to share

15:21

with you let's see if it works

16:20

all projects are initiated to create

16:24

impact that's essential the key is to

16:27

identify and focus on impact right from

16:29

the start impact changes the dialogue

16:32

from being centered around technical

16:34

deliverables to ensuring stakeholder

16:36

satisfaction flow is key when flow is

16:40

missing important project hours are lost

16:43

in coordination retrospective project

16:45

reporting and shifts between multiple

16:47

projects at the same time by focusing on

16:51

flow we're using simple methods to

16:53

intensify project work and share

16:55

progress every week and deliver results

16:57

faster we aspire to revolutionize the

17:01

way projects should be led with less

17:03

bureaucracy less formal steering

17:05

committee meetings and less contractual

17:07

focus we need less compliance and more

17:11

commitment and we need leaders who can

17:13

cope with turbulence conflicts and

17:15

complexity leaders who focus on people

17:18

work closely together handle issues and

17:21

joint force and know the project at its

17:24

core

17:35

so it's all about impact flow and

17:38

leadership and that's one of the reasons

17:41

why we're here today but let's just go

17:44

through with the purpose the purpose is

17:46

to an establish the half-double

17:48

methodology as a new project paradigm

17:51

we've been working on this paradigm for

17:53

the last or at least on the methodology

17:55

on the last three years and now we are

17:59

in a kind of a mode where we have a

18:01

ready to go live version of project

18:03

half-double we know it's gonna change

18:06

from here but at least this is the

18:08

combined learning and input and all the

18:12

great things that you've given us from

18:14

the community to to kind of bound

18:16

together a methodology that we think

18:19

will we'll be able to do projects in

18:21

half the time with double the impact so

18:24

the sub purposes is first of all to

18:27

enhance collaboration across the

18:29

community because when you talk to each

18:31

other things starts happening and this

18:33

is very much about creating the the wave

18:35

that nilz refer to just before the

18:39

second purpose is to share some of the

18:41

results from the pilot projects that

18:43

we've done so far so in the last year

18:46

we've done seven experiments trying to

18:49

apply this methodology but also to

18:51

develop it as we moved along and we've

18:53

learned a lot but we also created quite

18:55

some results out there that we would

18:57

like to share with you the third thing

19:00

is to make the methodology travel so

19:02

today we will try to dive into each of

19:05

the core elements so that you will have

19:07

an opportunity to do some of these

19:09

things in your own organizations try to

19:11

make it work back home and then lastly

19:14

giving back to the community you have

19:16

helped us a lot so far and a very

19:18

essential part of Project half-double is

19:21

to have a strong community to kind of

19:23

have these synergy going on between

19:25

great thoughts happening but also how to

19:28

make this work in real life and you have

19:30

provided that input all along so we're

19:33

hoping by inviting Erin Chen her here to

19:36

inspire you but also to share the whole

19:38

methodology that we can give a little

19:40

back to all

19:40

great thinks that you've given to the

19:42

half-double methodology so the program

19:46

of today looks something like this we're

19:48

just about to kick off the whole session

19:50

and in a short while you will have a you

19:55

will have Erin Chen her to address why

19:57

is this not just a Danish problem why is

19:59

this a global issue that we would need

20:01

to address then we'll have a short break

20:04

and after that I'm gonna introduce you

20:06

to the half-double methodology as it is

20:08

today you will have an opportunity to

20:11

dive into three out of the nine methods

20:15

after my introduction so you will have

20:17

to choose which of the nine methods you

20:19

want to get an imp depth inside to

20:22

afterwards we will do some rotations

20:24

between smaller stations where you will

20:27

have to make your own choices we'll have

20:30

lunch

20:30

and during lunch we will also do a pulse

20:34

check as you know the main principle for

20:36

creating impact is stakeholder

20:38

satisfaction so we will ask you you know

20:41

how are we doing are we on the right

20:43

track and we will summarize on those

20:45

results later on but at lunch please

20:48

remember to check your email because

20:50

there you will find a link to do the

20:52

pulse check of this conference after

20:55

lunch urn Shanghai will introduce his

20:58

perspective to project half-double

21:00

because we've had quite some discussions

21:02

and great dialogue going on and the

21:04

other things that we were doing each of

21:06

us and also Erin China has a great way

21:10

of approaching how innovation might make

21:13

or break your project based on a lot of

21:15

research done within the last twenty

21:17

years after the session with Erin we're

21:22

gonna have the opportunity to visit each

21:24

of the seven pilot projects to gain more

21:26

in-depth insight to what did we actually

21:29

do and before that session I'm going to

21:31

introduce through the main learnings and

21:33

some of the main results then we'll wrap

21:36

it all up with expert conclusions we

21:38

have six very key people to the movement

21:41

that I'm gonna ask a few questions and

21:43

we're gonna share their answers and then

21:46

we have a small surprise for you to wrap

21:48

it all up so at three o'clock we will be

21:50

joining out here in the networking area

21:52

to

21:53

have a glass of wine and celebrate how

21:55

far we've gone so far are you excited

21:59

are you at the right conference good

22:04

start this is actually interesting

22:10

because we looked into some of the

22:13

prominent researchers within project

22:15

management and we came about Aaron

22:18

shin-hye who's a professor in project

22:19

management he's also a world leader

22:21

within projects and innovation

22:23

management the interesting thing here is

22:26

that we figured that Aaron would be able

22:28

to inspire us and when we talk to Aaron

22:31

it turned out that he was actually doing

22:33

a lot of similar things that we were

22:35

doing so we were not just you know

22:38

talking to someone who might be able to

22:40

inspire us we were actually talking to

22:42

someone who was at the exact same

22:45

journey as we are and that's remarkable

22:47

and that's the reason why we have Aaron

22:49

Sheehan who are here today because there

22:50

is a remarkable overlap between the

22:52

things that we think should be done and

22:54

the thing that Aaron is will be doing in

22:56

reality so as you can see amazing

23:00

credentials having spent 20 years

23:02

actually doing projects and then as a

23:04

corporate VP and another 20 years in

23:07

academics with about 150 publications

23:10

and six books we have a very we have

23:14

actually a thought leader within project

23:16

management with us today

23:17

so Aaron will you do us the honor of

23:21

telling us why is this also a global

23:24

problem please give an applause to error

23:39

thank you Michael

23:42

it's a pleasure to be here it's an honor

23:45

to be here it's my second visit to

23:48

Denmark first visit was 30 years ago I

23:53

came back and I found the community of

23:56

very nice people friendly people and I

23:59

welcome the opportunity to be here but I

24:02

still didn't figure out what's the best

24:04

Danish food somebody can enlighten me on

24:09

that please talk to me and if you want

24:11

to talk to me about other things I'll be

24:13

here so other day I was invited by the

24:17

team of half-double and I want to thank

24:20

thank this team for the invitation

24:22

they've been very kind and very

24:24

receptive and very hosting very well so

24:29

I want to thank the Michael Ellis

24:32

project manager the owner has I met

24:36

yesterday and the rest of the team the

24:39

Christine and pear severing and the

24:43

University this collaboration and all

24:45

the other team I think you're doing a

24:47

very important job and nice job so I

24:50

congratulate you for this effort I was

24:54

asked to share with you my perspectives

24:57

about project my project management's

25:00

yesterday so a few words about myself as

25:05

you heard I had two careers both of them

25:10

on project management I'm a professor

25:12

now don't be too much impressed by the

25:16

world professor I'm like anybody else

25:18

I'm a project manager I've done projects

25:22

actually for 20 years and during this

25:25

period I've made every mistake possible

25:28

so then I decided it's time to learn why

25:31

I made all these mistakes I went to the

25:34

academic hold of course you cannot

25:37

correct mistakes of the past or at least

25:39

you can learn and after another 20 years

25:42

now I have an answer my answer

25:45

to all these difficulties problems and

25:48

struggles and challenges that the

25:50

profession is facing but that's what I

25:52

want to share with you today when I was

25:55

approached by the team we've been

25:56

walking and talking for I think now

25:59

almost more than six months when I was

26:03

approached I didn't know about this

26:04

project and I said well that's great

26:06

somebody finally is doing something

26:08

about it because that's what I was

26:10

trying to do for the last 20 years in

26:13

fact so let me begin the first thing

26:19

that I would like to say is that

26:21

projects are increasing today the amount

26:24

of projects is increasing and Lynn's

26:27

referred to this the project walk is

26:30

actually white collar walk that means if

26:33

your project manager in the right place

26:35

that's the good news but the bad news is

26:39

this okay the reality is that most

26:44

projects don't make it and I want to

26:46

address this question from my

26:47

perspective why and what's going on so

26:51

the first of all is the challenge

26:53

projects become harder they become more

26:57

complex they become faster technology is

27:00

moving very fast and competition is

27:03

stronger innovation is very critical and

27:05

time we cut shorter and I'm coming to

27:09

this in a few minutes techniques have

27:11

not changed much so we as project

27:15

managers we are facing a more and more

27:17

difficult task every day okay here's

27:21

some data of course all the studies

27:24

focus on large projects so there's a

27:26

project that studies on mega projects

27:28

you see mega projects by definition

27:31

almost don't meet their time and cost

27:34

objectives and you see the overruns here

27:35

which is tremendous you have a Danish

27:38

project here you can see okay

27:41

the other thing is the statistics the

27:44

statistics shows there's a Kaos report

27:46

every year coming out about IT and

27:49

communication projects and you see the

27:52

results are very consistent over the

27:54

years you see about 30 percent

27:58

says 22% for 20% failure and 50%

28:04

challenged challenge is a nice way to

28:07

say we don't like it but what can we do

28:12

it's a priori finished we finished

28:14

somehow it's not exactly what we have in

28:16

mind that's challenged that's not good

28:19

enough as Michael said it's good enough

28:22

if Neil said it's not good enough okay

28:24

so we have to understand before we find

28:27

solutions we have to understand okay so

28:30

let me give you an example few examples

28:32

to illustrate the point and these are

28:37

two major projects in aerospace I'm

28:41

involved in the aerospace I've been in

28:42

the aerospace industry I work now with

28:44

aerospace industry in America and I see

28:47

this all the time

28:47

huge projects suffer big overruns now

28:51

Boeing and Airbus have both suffered big

28:54

over us Airbus 380 was late to market by

28:58

two years to CEOs lost a job because of

29:01

this project

29:02

Boeing doubled the time no double the

29:07

budget I'm sorry from twenty to forty

29:09

billion dollar and a delay of say three

29:11

and a half years on a huge project okay

29:15

huge now these are not marginal project

29:19

these are central business projects

29:21

Boeing had nine hundred orders before

29:24

the project was completed a backlog big

29:28

disappointin has three project managers

29:30

were in play at the place what do you

29:32

think are they bad project managers no

29:37

they chose the best people you know so

29:41

there's something going on and they have

29:42

used the latest techniques in project

29:44

management okay and my question is could

29:48

they do better and I believe yes so I

29:51

wanna share with you my object my

29:52

objective my perspective about this

29:54

including my perspective about

29:56

half-double I want to talk about a few

29:59

other projects and the question is are

30:02

they successful on the top left side you

30:05

can see the Sydney Opera House how many

30:08

of you have been in Australia oh yeah

30:11

who you travel guys right and you have

30:14

seen this building right isn't it

30:17

beautiful

30:18

one of the most beautiful tourist

30:20

attractions in the world but there's a

30:22

project that project started with a

30:27

budget of seven million dollar in a

30:29

schedule of six years well it was

30:32

completed it was finally after 16 years

30:34

and a hundred million dollar how is that

30:38

from project matter of perspective

30:40

not so good right if you have a project

30:43

that is overrun you cannot use this

30:45

example by the way if you have a project

30:49

that has a big offer and you cannot tell

30:50

your management trust me I'm building

30:52

the Sydney Opera House I was gonna buy

30:56

it but is it a success story or not

30:59

today nobody cares okay in contrast the

31:04

bottom left is the Los Angeles subway

31:06

that project in the 90s decided we need

31:09

a subway and Metro in Los Angeles 11

31:13

miles of the first red line project set

31:17

goes meeting time cost of safety and

31:20

operations goes and they paid another

31:22

goal to win an industry Award for

31:25

Excellence in project management they

31:27

met all these goals but there was only

31:30

one problem what was the problem

31:33

anybody knows nobody is using it less

31:38

Angeles is a city of automobiles they

31:42

expected a million passengers a year

31:44

they only had 60,000 passengers they

31:48

stopped the project so it is the success

31:51

or failure from the traditional

31:53

standpoint beautiful so we have to go

31:56

further than us what is really a

31:58

successful project on the right you have

32:00

the Denver Airport on the top which was

32:03

a construction project this was delayed

32:05

by one and a half years construction my

32:08

god and an overrun of 1.5 billion dollar

32:12

why colors want component there the

32:16

automated baggage system it's supposed

32:19

to move the bags really quickly from one

32:21

point to another didn't walk

32:24

delay the whole project this project was

32:27

really high-tech I'll come to this later

32:29

the rest of the project was construction

32:32

construction and high tech they managed

32:34

it exactly like they manage the rest of

32:36

the airport and it delayed the whole

32:38

thing and on the bottom on the left you

32:41

see the Segway you know the Segway

32:43

fantastic vehicle that Megan was

32:45

supposed to revolutionize the world

32:48

paradigm shift in transportation they

32:52

assumed that this will replace

32:54

automobiles under this assumption they

32:58

built a manufacturing plant in New

33:00

Hampshire in America they didn't wanna

33:01

outsource it to build 16,000 segways a

33:07

year they only sold 60,000 so it was a

33:12

business failure the product is great

33:14

business failure didn't meet the

33:16

expectations and on the right on the

33:18

bottom you have the what's called the

33:22

forgot the name

33:23

you know the Motorola I don't know what

33:28

Iridium that's my thank you iridium is

33:32

supposed to be a satellite cell phone

33:34

they spent seven billion dollar Motorola

33:38

on this project when it was completed

33:40

iridium walked but nobody wanted to buy

33:43

it you know why because it was heavy

33:45

expensive $8 a minute while cell

33:49

technology moved so fast they continued

33:51

the project it has a successful failure

33:54

here's the question okay so under these

33:57

assumptions I would like to go on and

33:59

offer some perspective from research so

34:03

from research we know first of all that

34:07

planning and using the existing tools

34:10

doesn't guarantee success that's a fact

34:13

in fact no project failed because the

34:16

project manager didn't know how to use

34:18

Microsoft Project project failed because

34:23

of other reasons and I'll come to this

34:25

later okay

34:26

so why projects fail because of unclear

34:31

goals because of lack of leadership miss

34:36

reading the MA

34:38

and the last one is significant didn't

34:40

understand the challenges the

34:42

difficulties in this project and it's

34:44

not risk remember the world it's not

34:48

risk

34:48

don't you think boring man is risk

34:50

correctly first they did they didn't how

34:53

to address the challenges it's a big

34:55

factor in failures and I'll come to this

34:58

later it's part of innovation because

35:00

innovation can make or break your

35:02

project

35:04

that's why projects thing so what do we

35:06

know we know that the challenges keep

35:09

growing but the methodologies don't grow

35:14

so fast so I'm going to put a question

35:19

for discussion in a few minutes I'm

35:20

going to introduce the question now do

35:23

you recognize these issues around you

35:25

and your company in your projects etc

35:27

okay so we have the book on the left

35:34

side you have the pimp book in English

35:37

on the right you have the pimp book in

35:39

Hebrew if you still don't know I'm in

35:42

Israeli my accent is not Copenhagen

35:45

accent it's not an American accent I

35:48

grew up in Israel and my first career

35:50

was in Israel and I live in America now

35:53

so they have the pimp book in in Hebrew

35:56

do you have a pin book of Danish

35:57

yeah you have translation yeah not yet

36:01

send me the picture I need okay so the

36:05

pin book is like the Bible right so I

36:08

ask you a question this is all the

36:10

knowledge combined in one book and it's

36:14

big 600 pages keeps growing by the way

36:18

fifth editions they're preparing now the

36:21

sixth edition is going to be 800 players

36:23

oh now this is big it's bigger than the

36:27

Bible

36:29

okay so I ask you a question this is the

36:33

knowledge and here's the question so we

36:36

have the book and suppose you manage the

36:39

book the your project by the book

36:41

exactly by the book will you project be

36:45

successful what do you think

36:49

yes no maybe not always right it's not

36:55

the book I don't say the book is bad

36:58

don't get me wrong the book is the good

37:01

thing because it includes all the

37:03

knowledge and stuff but I only said

37:06

something else about the book it's it's

37:11

kind of I want to argue two things okay

37:18

maybe the book is too much let me

37:21

address this and then the second

37:23

question maybe something is missing in

37:25

the book why is the book so much because

37:28

imagine that you are managing a project

37:32

and you want to follow the book I want

37:35

to show you a picture from the pin book

37:44

this is the whole story right hold up

37:48

can you imagine one project that is

37:51

using all these things not even one

37:54

that means you don't need the whole book

37:58

okay when you go to a doctor you have

38:02

stomach problems you want the doctor to

38:05

treat your stomach your pain you don't

38:08

want them to open all the medical books

38:11

that they study to find what's wrong

38:13

with you when you go to a lawyer you

38:16

have a dispute with your neighbor you

38:18

want him to solve your problem you don't

38:20

want them to lose all the law books that

38:22

he'll and the same thing this project we

38:25

don't need to hold this huge book to

38:27

manage project we need much less how do

38:29

we know that's part of the problem okay

38:32

so I believe in the statement that says

38:40

less is more

38:43

okay

38:45

you buy into this good that's a great

38:50

great philosophy simplicity less is more

38:56

we teach young project managers the

38:58

whole book when they come to the to all

39:01

they open the book and say all right I

39:03

gotta follow this and this and this and

39:04

this and then they they try to be very

39:06

very precise and then they spend a lot

39:08

of time the wisdom is to learn and know

39:11

what you have to find in the book I said

39:13

the book is good it's the knowledge you

39:16

got to know the knowledge but is not a

39:17

guide it's called guide but it's not a

39:20

guide how to manage projects so we have

39:22

to take the book in the right way in the

39:24

right perspective okay and now we have

39:27

used the rule that says the diamond

39:29

principle a diamond is something they're

39:31

driving me for years in my company we

39:34

have a consulting and training company

39:36

it's a young company and the diamond

39:40

this guiding a lot of philosophy that

39:42

says everything has to be less than four

39:44

like the diamond shape has less than

39:47

four elements and which is that we try

39:49

to simplify everything I'll show you

39:51

what I mean okay

39:55

but I said in most project managers

39:59

mother you don't need the whole book you

40:01

got to select and you gotta learn to

40:03

tailor and that's an art at this stage

40:07

but we would like to turn it into a

40:09

science what does it mean experienced

40:12

project man that just know how to tailor

40:16

but it takes twenty twenty-five years of

40:18

experience to know and we want to

40:21

educate the young generation to learn

40:22

this really faster and right now we

40:28

don't have a formal accepted way so I'm

40:33

continuing with the research the second

40:36

question is what's missing in the book

40:41

okay so I want introduce here a

40:44

conceptual picture of the knowledge

40:46

growth in the world you have here two

40:49

graphs one is the growth in technology

40:51

and science that means we want to learn

40:56

faster

40:58

and we keep learning faster she's me so

41:06

the knowledge in technology and science

41:08

is exponentially growing huge we double

41:12

our knowledge every two years and it's

41:15

exponential and the blue and the red

41:18

shows the growth in project management

41:22

knowledge okay it's not that it is not

41:26

growing it's too slow

41:28

that means the gap increases and that is

41:32

the problem that's the problem that I've

41:34

been coping all this year that's a

41:36

problem that you guys and half-double

41:38

are coping the knowledge is not growing

41:40

fast enough okay how do we fill in the

41:44

gap and that comes me to the question of

41:52

what's missing in the book and I'm

41:55

looking at every profession made of two

41:57

parts science and art the science is the

42:03

formal way so it's in the books the

42:05

guidelines etc the art I just think that

42:08

people do under their own experience

42:10

their own way and like anything else the

42:13

iceberg is 20% above the water and 80%

42:17

below the water and I believe that in

42:20

project management 20% is the science

42:22

and 80% what does it mean it means that

42:25

these are the things that are important

42:27

for success as you've seen in my

42:29

previous slide when projects don't make

42:31

it they don't make it because of the

42:34

books other things so here we go the

42:39

science part includes all the technical

42:42

terms like work breakdown structure the

42:44

pill chance and and the the pin book

42:47

everything and the arts part includes

42:50

other things like managing uncertainty

42:51

mending change managing business

42:54

managing the challenge managing

42:56

innovation complexity all these things

43:01

are not in the book

43:02

so in my research over the last 2025

43:04

years we have been trying to turn the

43:08

art in

43:09

science learned from great project

43:11

managers and make this into a more

43:14

structured way and I'm gonna ask you a

43:17

simple question how much time do you

43:19

spend today on each path and usually you

43:24

realize you spend most of the time on

43:26

the top today because you followed the

43:29

rules but these are more important

43:32

things on the bottom but you cannot make

43:34

this into a science by looking at this

43:36

we went further so we studied as a

43:39

Michael mentioned we had a lot of

43:41

studies we studied failures by project

43:43

failure blah blah and then we looked at

43:46

the study said this doesn't give me an

43:48

answer why projects fail let's look the

43:50

other way

43:51

well projects succeed what did the best

43:55

projects in the world have in common

43:56

okay so I want to introduce one study

44:02

why some projects make it big the

44:05

biggest successes it's the good - great

44:11

study on project management and we found

44:17

that that research was published some

44:20

years ago at MIT Sloan and we found

44:23

seven elements that they have in common

44:25

okay

44:27

the elements are found in all the

44:30

greatest projects seven so here we go

44:33

they create the unique competitive

44:35

advantage and unique value they took a

44:40

long time until they started to walk in

44:42

the projects to prepare usually we

44:45

rushed the execution in the Western

44:47

society just do it you will know what we

44:50

have to do let's start doing it now wait

44:53

make sure spend a long time to prepare

44:56

the vision the plan the commitment the

44:59

people number three unique project

45:02

culture number four highly qualified

45:05

leader unconditional support good

45:09

leaders with high support from the top

45:11

at key doesn't always happen

45:16

number five using use the knowledge I

45:20

mean use what you have and adapt to what

45:22

you have number six the teams are

45:25

flexible change quickly the decisions

45:28

adapt to market technology and change

45:30

they are not rigid on number seven pride

45:35

okay

45:37

strong partnership on the ship and pride

45:39

now look at this list fantastic list

45:43

right can you do it I want them you know

45:50

there have been tons of study what's

45:52

called critical success factors started

45:55

thirty thirty five years ago it didn't

45:57

do anything to the profession because

45:59

you cannot learn anything from a list

46:03

because these are the secrets of the

46:05

stars and honestly you cannot learn from

46:09

the stars to illustrate this let's say

46:13

you want to be a good leader so look

46:15

around say who's a good leader judge I'm

46:18

going to read the book about Churchill

46:19

you read the book and now you know how

46:21

Churchill was a leader can you become

46:23

Churchill after you read the book of

46:26

course not

46:27

so it's not enough to have a list so we

46:30

went further in this research and we try

46:32

to see how we can combine this into

46:34

something more tangible and we have

46:36

created cluster analysis and we have

46:40

created three groups three groups

46:42

emerged of this seven elements the first

46:45

group is the business and the business

46:47

value the second group is the adapting

46:52

quickly adapting to circumstances

46:55

technology changes leadership and team

46:59

pride now these things can be turned

47:01

into a science ok and with this mindset

47:05

we have developed a methodology we call

47:09

it SPL strategic project leadership

47:12

later today I will describe it briefly

47:16

or everything goes fast here you know

47:18

half the time and I will also give you

47:22

my perspective about half-double and

47:26

here's here's what we do

47:28

I didn't introduce you at the SP

47:30

but this is what we found that the

47:32

elements are not in the book yet okay

47:36

it's the element of business the

47:38

strategy business value the leadership

47:41

the team spirit and the innovation

47:43

tailoring the project to the challenge

47:45

understanding and tailoring the project

47:47

so I'm coming back now to my questions

47:49

to you okay I'm repeating whatever we

47:52

learned from research okay

47:57

why projects don't make it and here's

48:01

the question do you recognize these

48:05

issues in your project so take a few

48:07

minutes talk your friend you've just got

48:09

to know your friends talk to each other

48:11

and talk about your issues and that's

48:14

the beginning of a break after that five

48:16

minutes we take a break

48:17

thank you

Learn about the Half Double Methodology & Literature and see other Half Double Video's on the Half Double conference 2016, the summary of Project Half Double Unfolded 2016. See also the longer format of Project Half Double Unfolded Part 2