Video - Behavioural science in relation to Half Double

A selection of Half Double Institute Videos covering a wide range of topics including the methodology, research, literature and case studies.
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Keynote speech by Paul Gibbons, author, speaker, and change management consultant, on how elements from behavioural science goes well hand in hand with the Half Double mindset.

Transcript - Paul Gibbons Video


 

00:04

i have to say

00:05

i am really honored to be part of this

00:08

and

00:08

i mean that you know i come from the

00:10

united states and

00:11

and people say stuff like that and it

00:13

usually means the opposite

00:15

but anyway so it sounds like a

00:17

politician thing to say doesn't it i'm

00:18

honored to be here

00:19

what a privilege and all that but i

00:21

really mean this is so

00:22

important because as we hear more and

00:25

more in the business world

00:26

about having businesses which are

00:28

two-speed

00:29

to have a core internal stable business

00:32

and

00:32

running more of our businesses like

00:34

projects on the outside

00:36

and as projects become increasingly part

00:39

of our life for better for worse that's

00:41

the way the world is right now

00:42

the fact that they still fail 20 30 40

00:45

50 60 70

00:47

of the time is a horrifying thing if you

00:50

think about where the risk is in a

00:51

business

00:52

and if you think about where the

00:53

opportunity is in a business lies in

00:56

projects a lot right

00:57

a lot and how you're trying to change

00:59

them so we need to do well and

01:01

one of the things that is terrific about

01:04

half double coming out

01:05

is it's something that in a way steals

01:08

march

01:08

on agile which is all over the united

01:11

states

01:11

imperfectly and only partially taken up

01:16

in the united states we talk a lot about

01:18

agile you go work inside of business

01:21

and it's still really kind of the old

01:23

waterfally thing

01:24

for real so we have something here

01:27

that's distinctively european

01:30

distinctively danish a country

01:33

known as far as i know only for two

01:35

things famous physicists

01:37

and hugo what you could do well this is

01:41

something that's really important

01:42

and it's important because in a sense

01:44

because the prosperity of your country

01:46

is going to depend on the prosperity of

01:47

your businesses that's an obviously

01:49

stupidly obvious thing to say

01:51

but also the proof of the european model

01:53

the proof of european social democracy

01:56

the

01:56

proof that we can have capitalism in the

01:58

world but we can still be compassionate

02:00

we can still care for the environment

02:02

these are all things that matter to me

02:04

personally it's not too ideological or

02:05

too political to say so

02:07

so that's why i'm really happy happy to

02:10

be here

02:12

i got into change management in 1993

02:16

i know that we share a story we share a

02:18

similar story

02:20

i did a project for barclays bank in

02:22

england

02:23

i was a new consultant i was 33 years

02:25

old had a new nice new suit and a nice

02:27

red tie

02:28

nice briefcase and we went and we wrote

02:31

a report

02:33

we charged them 1.6 million pounds 2

02:36

million dollars for our reports big

02:37

report

02:38

it's like nine months work and we talked

02:41

to everybody in the business with this

02:43

report

02:43

the business unit heads the board the

02:46

chairman chief executive

02:47

all the stakeholders all the powerpoints

02:50

lies all the engagement

02:51

all the enthusiasm all the inspiration

02:53

in the world nothing

02:54

happened with that report nothing

02:57

happened

02:58

they did nothing they didn't like it

02:59

it's not that they didn't agree

03:01

they paid the fee of 2 million but

03:03

nothing happened no change happened

03:05

so i thought to myself i was a young

03:07

idealistic consultant like many of you

03:09

sitting in the audience to think when

03:10

are they going to blow the whistle on us

03:12

are we really going to end up not in

03:14

jail for charging these guys 2 million

03:16

dollars

03:17

for telling them what to do and then

03:19

walking away and saying good luck with

03:20

that

03:21

hope it works out for you which is what

03:23

we did which was a model of consulting

03:25

in the 1990s

03:26

so i became fascinated by change

03:27

management and

03:29

when i retrained myself i took courses

03:32

in two different disciplines

03:34

two different sides of this chasm

03:37

project management one language

03:40

time cost quality one set of tools

03:44

microsoft project same remember that

03:46

gantt charts

03:48

excel spreadsheets all that stuff right

03:50

and the other side change management we

03:51

were talking about people

03:53

and feelings and involvement and

03:55

participation and well

03:56

right and this is like two different

03:58

worlds right

04:00

but they didn't really interact which i

04:02

thought you know even then was a bizarre

04:04

thing

04:04

so i retrained myself in these

04:09

disciplines i began to study change

04:11

management and then

04:12

another famous danish scholar whose name

04:15

is bent flav

04:16

bjerg is that right at oxford how's that

04:20

pronunciation okay

04:22

oh i couldn't say that in a million

04:25

years

04:26

my mouth won't do that um it talks about

04:28

project overruns

04:31

and how for some of these biggest ones

04:33

these are from the united states and

04:34

from great britain

04:35

but we have plenty examples all over the

04:37

world about how much it costs us when

04:39

projects go badly

04:42

so that's one of the chasms so here's

04:45

another chasm

04:46

as i went out to write this yellow book

04:48

i was reading a lot about behavioral

04:50

science

04:51

how many people have read a book called

04:53

nudge

04:55

how many people have read a book called

04:56

thinking fast and slow

04:58

predictably irrational some of these

05:01

other

05:02

great great books anti-fragiles another

05:05

one

05:06

that was written about 2012 2013.

05:10

so i was writing this book on change

05:12

management and i was reading all this

05:13

cool stuff over here

05:15

and it occurred to me at the time that

05:17

nobody in the change management world

05:19

was really doing any work on behavioral

05:20

science okay so 2013 2014

05:23

things changed a little bit so

05:27

we look at these change management

05:28

models

05:30

we talked about from the 1940s

05:37

through 2003

05:41

and you know what there's no behavioral

05:43

change in there

05:45

now ask anybody who's worked on projects

05:47

for a long time especially projects that

05:49

have gone badly

05:50

you'll say what went wrong and they say

05:51

we didn't change behaviors it's just

05:53

kind of a stupid thing to say right

05:54

how can you have a project without

05:55

changing behaviors how can you have a

05:57

system

05:58

that the users don't use right

06:01

well we got the system in nobody uses it

06:04

i mean you say that we joke about it now

06:06

but we had a knowledge management system

06:08

at pricewaterhousecoopers in the 1990s

06:10

nobody used it nobody used it because it

06:13

required consultants

06:15

to put in their proposals and their

06:16

project plans and their post-project

06:18

evaluations

06:19

and their project documentation they

06:21

actually had to do the work to upload it

06:23

into the system otherwise the system

06:24

would be useless

06:25

but we didn't want to change our

06:26

behavior when the project was over we

06:29

wanted to go on to the next thing

06:31

or go home to see our wives and children

06:34

so behaviors didn't change no one used

06:36

the system and with something like a

06:38

knowledge management system if nothing

06:39

goes into it nothing comes out of it

06:42

no knowledge comes out of it so it's a

06:44

fairly standard complaint in project

06:46

failure is that the behaviors don't

06:47

change

06:48

so if you look at this stuff here

06:52

that i studied so lovingly

06:55

for well i studied it for a few years

06:57

and then i started to teach it

06:59

there's no behavioral change built in

07:00

there

07:02

and one of the great discussions we had

07:05

over here in the corner

07:07

is change models as written a decade ago

07:11

or two decades ago or three decades ago

07:13

they weren't very good on behavioral

07:14

change then and they're absolutely

07:17

terrible

07:18

in the context of today's businesses

07:20

terrible terrible terrible

07:22

harmful i would say modders such as

07:25

cotters from harvard

07:26

are positively harmful if you try and

07:29

apply them

07:30

in today's businesses the way they're

07:33

run today with today's business

07:34

challenges

07:35

and so this is the big gap

07:39

between what goes in up here our ideas

07:42

our dreams our goals our aspirations

07:45

our plans and our actions our behaviors

07:49

this is a problem that's at the root of

07:52

human happiness

07:53

it's at the root of prosperous societies

07:56

and it's at the root of business success

07:58

is how do you line up that which is here

08:02

with hands and behaviors does that make

08:05

sense

08:06

to some extent and i'll tell you what

08:08

we're really bad at it

08:10

so here's a quiz what percentage of

08:12

heart attack victims

08:14

change their diet exercise and smoking

08:16

behaviors

08:18

come on what do we see here

08:22

30. we have a 30 higher

08:26

lower 20 we have a 30 and 20.

08:30

you guys are very generous to your

08:32

fellow human beings you know that

08:34

you're being very too kind anybody have

08:36

another answer

08:38

there's much lower there's seven percent

08:41

now our own model of changes

08:45

if it's rational it's a good idea

08:49

you can make a case for it and it's

08:51

emotional

08:52

what are called two sides of the brain

08:53

it's a metaphor it's not accurate but

08:55

whatever

08:56

you should want to change right so

08:58

what's more emotional and more

08:59

rational you know having a heart attack

09:01

you've got pretty good reasons

09:02

rationally

09:03

and you just about left your loved ones

09:05

behind it's pretty emotional

09:07

seven percent behavioral change wow

09:10

that's pretty weird right so something's

09:12

wrong with our model

09:14

for sure because it doesn't explain that

09:17

what percentage of obese people

09:19

say they want to lose weight okay i'm

09:20

one we have one data point

09:22

um so um what percentage of obese people

09:25

say they want to lose weight 95

09:27

right what percent achieve it in a given

09:29

year five percent

09:30

okay that's a pretty big gap right of

09:32

those five percent one in 20

09:34

who change what percent of it

09:38

maintain it after a year about another

09:40

five percent right

09:41

fire obesity is the biggest problem

09:43

today so

09:46

these are the way it's terrible in

09:48

business what percentage of change

09:50

programs

09:50

fail it depends what you mean by failure

09:54

but if it's coming short of expectations

09:56

if the change is sustainable if there's

09:58

a cost overrun

09:59

if we have to cancel the project there's

10:01

a whole way of understanding that

10:02

depends what you mean

10:04

but it hovers around 40 30 to 50 percent

10:07

somewhere in there

10:08

depending on the kind of change culture

10:10

change exceeds about 19

10:11

of the time 19 of the time

10:15

how often have you heard or read in a

10:18

management book or

10:19

heard a ceo talk about we have to change

10:21

the culture

10:24

oh my god okay here we go again right

10:27

yeah

10:28

almost never succeeds 20 of the time

10:31

yeah but yet it's like

10:32

something that you hear people say all

10:34

the time right we have to change the

10:35

culture we have to get the culture right

10:36

we need this kind of culture we need a

10:38

data science culture

10:39

so very interesting so

10:43

why does this happen

10:46

and here's the model that is underlying

10:50

all these change models that i showed

10:52

you on the earlier slide

10:54

is there's a two-step model of how we

10:57

change behaviors

10:58

step one change hearts and minds

11:02

so you inspire people you educate them

11:06

you convince them you persuade them you

11:09

inspire

11:10

what are some other good words for it

11:12

you change what's inside here right

11:14

and then this is where the miracle

11:16

happens

11:17

behaviors follow

11:20

so how easy is it to change someone's

11:23

mind

11:25

hearts and mind that's not that easy to

11:27

begin with right in fact there's

11:28

something called the backfire effect

11:30

you'll love this right a professor of

11:32

public policy in american university

11:34

the backfire effect if you provide

11:36

someone who's a climate science denier

11:39

with facts it's strengthens their

11:42

opposition

11:43

to climate science right and this

11:46

happens all over it happens in politics

11:48

and it happens all over provision of

11:50

facts

11:51

strengthens their opposition if they're

11:54

ideologically committed it's called

11:56

motivated reasoning

11:58

yeah it's not really reasoning at all so

12:00

reasoning and inverted commas

12:02

so it's not very easy to do this but all

12:05

over

12:05

in our education system and in the way

12:08

we run businesses and the way we run

12:10

society

12:11

we assume that if you change what's

12:14

inside between

12:15

the ears it will manifest itself and

12:18

change in the real world

12:20

it doesn't happen it's a fantasy so

12:23

what's better than that

12:24

we have in the 21st century this thing

12:27

called behavioral science

12:31

what does it suggest it says first of

12:33

all we don't

12:34

change our beliefs about the world

12:37

according to what we

12:38

see we change what we see

12:42

according to our beliefs about the world

12:44

you've heard the confirmation bias right

12:47

in a way what we operate as

12:50

as people running around like rats in

12:53

the maze looking for reasons we're right

12:54

about the world

12:56

that's in fact the way you know

12:58

perception biases work

13:00

and so there's a whole family of things

13:01

that are cognitive biases there's about

13:03

100 of them on wikipedia they're very

13:06

interesting very few people have thought

13:08

about how

13:11

cognitive biases affect decision making

13:13

in business

13:14

if you think about it's kind of strange

13:16

right there's a collection of people

13:18

they're making strategy decisions and

13:20

operational decisions and marketing

13:21

decisions and

13:22

you know they're making decisions all

13:23

the time very little work has been done

13:26

on how cognitive biases skew those in

13:29

stupid directions

13:30

so that's one part and the second part

13:32

is

13:33

we have this idea about the world that

13:35

our beliefs shape our actions

13:37

but actually partly what happens is our

13:40

actions shape our belief

13:42

not only do how we act in the world

13:43

shape what we're able to see and

13:45

perceive in the world

13:46

but also if you for example show people

13:49

research

13:50

on if you saw people research on

13:53

climate science right in america climate

13:55

science favors a famous example

13:57

if they drive a big truck you know what

13:58

they're less likely to believe it

14:00

right in a sense the behavior is

14:03

determining what they choose to believe

14:04

about the world

14:06

rather than their beliefs about the

14:10

world determining their actions

14:12

so it's a two-way street so that's

14:13

behavioral science sort of

14:15

in a very high level in a slide and what

14:17

does that mean that means in all of our

14:19

change models and that includes half

14:21

double

14:21

that includes however you're beginning

14:23

to work you need some very

14:24

practical tools from behavioral science

14:27

to begin to work directly with behaviors

14:29

so you don't have

14:30

to rely on persuasion to change

14:33

behaviors

14:34

because it won't so

14:38

there's a bunch of different tools and

14:39

i'm going to give you one that i think

14:41

i'm going to give you actually three

14:43

three that i think are the best and the

14:45

most fun and the most useful

14:47

and this is stuff really i wrote this

14:49

book in 2013.

14:51

uh there's a 2019 edition of it

14:55

this stuff was up to the minute when it

14:58

was written

14:58

so this stuff is hot hot off the press

15:02

mindspace was developed by the

15:05

behavioral insights team at the uk

15:08

cabinet and mindspace is a framework for

15:11

understanding behavioral change

15:14

and influence and it's research based

15:18

and they hired this guy from chicago who

15:20

wrote

15:21

one of them cast sunsteiner thaler that

15:23

wrote nudge

15:24

to become a consultant on it so this is

15:26

quite a famous

15:28

organization in the uk formerly

15:32

european nation the uk um

15:35

and so what are the elements of mind

15:37

space messenger incentives

15:38

norms default salience priming affect

15:41

commitment ego so there's a lot of

15:43

psychobabble up there it's a word what

15:44

we call a word salad

15:46

messenger who will people listen to

15:49

sometimes it will be someone that's an

15:51

authority but sometimes people want to

15:52

listen to someone like me

15:54

teenage mothers when you're talking

15:56

about pregnancy prevention

15:58

i actually prefer to talk to someone

15:59

they can relate to who understand what

16:00

it's like to be teenage mother right or

16:02

what it's like to be a teen

16:04

under the sort of pressures they

16:05

experience so that's one example of

16:07

thinking carefully when you're

16:08

interested in behavioral change and

16:10

influence about the messenger the second

16:12

is incentives incentives don't work in

16:14

the way that economists have thought

16:15

they work for years sometimes no

16:17

incentive is better than an

16:18

incentive sometimes a big incentive

16:21

works worse than a

16:23

small incentive don't waste your money

16:25

on a big incentive if a small one will

16:26

work

16:27

they work in very peculiar ways but

16:30

let's think about the incentives

16:31

there in the system norms what are the

16:33

cultural norms

16:34

are they on my side are they against me

16:38

defaults what are the default settings

16:40

for example

16:41

in denmark you have an atrocious rate of

16:44

organ donation

16:46

seven percent apparently i'll show you a

16:49

slide in a minute

16:50

in austria it's 90 you know why why do

16:53

you think

16:54

are you more stingy with your organs

16:56

than austria

16:58

yeah bingo head of the class here

17:02

you have to say and in the united states

17:03

by the way you have to say go on take my

17:05

kidneys my liver

17:06

yeah you have to check opt-in in austria

17:10

you have to opt out

17:11

no no i don't want i don't want any

17:13

touching my kidneys when i'm dead

17:15

you have to actually say that so but if

17:17

you think about how simple that changes

17:19

and this is the amazing thing about

17:20

behavioral science

17:21

is that little tiny change from opt-in

17:25

to opt-out produces a

17:28

swing from about seven percent in

17:29

denmark to about 90 in austria

17:32

okay there can be cultural differences

17:34

that explain it as well but if we look

17:36

at the slide which i'll show you in a

17:37

minute

17:37

it's not all explained by culture so

17:39

that's pretty interesting right

17:40

a little small change produces a huge

17:43

change in behavior

17:44

so we have salience stories personal

17:47

personal relevance affect emotion we

17:50

have priming using cues in the

17:52

environment we have

17:53

affect commitment making having making

17:56

public commitments

17:57

and we have ego and identity i'm not the

18:00

kind of person who

18:01

or i am the kind of person who so these

18:03

are triggers that you can use and you

18:05

can use this very practically so this is

18:06

super abstract sounding right

18:08

it is research based but you can

18:10

actually set yourself up a checklist

18:13

so at the beginning half double you have

18:16

the impact case right

18:18

and it's a cascade of goals down to

18:20

behavioral goals

18:21

and so you get down to behavioral goals

18:23

you can say okay we're going to wait by

18:24

magic for these behavioral goals to

18:26

happen

18:26

okay what are we going to do we can set

18:28

kpis okay that's a good thing

18:30

what do kpis depend on well they depend

18:33

on the performance management system

18:35

right but we can do more than that and

18:37

we can do better than that you don't

18:38

want to rely on the performance

18:39

management system god help you right

18:41

you can think about okay we're

18:43

behavioral scientists now

18:45

let's use this checklist and think how

18:48

these can be supportive of the kind of

18:49

behavioral changes that are in our

18:51

impact case

18:54

we have in the behavioral science

18:56

something called

18:58

the feast fun easy attractive social and

19:01

timely let me show you some examples

19:05

timely

19:08

so you can lecture people till they're

19:09

blue in the face about how they should

19:11

walk up two stairs and down one or down

19:13

two and up one or something like that

19:15

which is more effective that yeah

19:19

that's funny right it's good

19:23

okay you can nag people about not

19:26

littering

19:27

but you can make it fun not to litter

19:32

ah here we go look at this little

19:35

northern country on the left here

19:37

holy sh what is that how did that happen

19:42

look at those countries where you have

19:43

to opt out it's pretty cool right

19:46

that's a huge change

19:49

one of the things that my electricity

19:50

company does in the united states

19:53

is they send me a letter once a month

19:54

saying this is how much energy you use

19:58

this is how much your neighbors use this

20:00

is how much your efficient neighbors use

20:02

do you use this and do you get this in

20:03

denmark okay

20:05

so this is a nudge right in fact it's

20:07

one of the few ways

20:09

let's say denmark america is like two

20:11

decades behind

20:12

denmark and implementation of green tech

20:14

but this is something

20:16

and this changes behaviors look this is

20:18

one letter

20:19

it reduces energy usage by seven percent

20:23

seven percent in the united states

20:26

that's a lot of carbon dioxide right

20:28

a lot of fossil fuel one letter

20:32

once a month saying this is how your

20:34

energy use compares to your neighbors

20:37

seven percent reduction so when i say

20:39

that behavioral science produces huge

20:41

changes for really small interventions

20:44

i'm not kidding

20:45

right that is a lot of carbon saved for

20:48

a single letter

20:51

this is something that's of concern

20:53

mostly i'll say to women in the audience

20:55

as well um is if you ever lived with men

20:58

you know that

20:59

accuracy can be a trouble this is

21:01

another example

21:02

of a nudge how does this work i don't

21:05

know

21:05

i almost certainly would have saved five

21:07

or six of my relationships in at least

21:08

one marriage

21:16

so we can't leave behavioral science

21:19

without talking about

21:21

habits those horrible things

21:24

hard to change it's hard to get good

21:27

ones and god knows we all have enough

21:28

bad ones right

21:30

so let's talk about

21:33

one of the misconceptions about habits

21:37

that they're about motivation okay so

21:39

get that out of your mind

21:41

motivation is not your friend when

21:44

motivation is a function of physical

21:47

arousal

21:48

you wake up some mornings right you

21:50

don't feel it you had a bad night's

21:52

sleep

21:53

you're tired you have jet lag your

21:55

motivation is a function of that arousal

21:57

right

21:58

clearly right physiologic physiological

22:00

and it's also a function of the

22:01

narrative

22:02

of the story that you're telling

22:04

yourself but your motivation

22:06

can be like this right you have days

22:08

when you feel really motivated

22:09

in days where you don't right

22:13

yeah so i used to live in a place in

22:16

america

22:17

it's kind of scandinavian place

22:19

wisconsin a lot of danes and swedes and

22:22

so forth there and you see people out

22:24

running when it's 25

22:25

minus 25 degrees they're out running and

22:28

i used to think to myself

22:30

what are they thinking how do they

22:32

motivate themselves

22:34

they don't they don't it's a habit

22:38

they don't every time they're going to

22:40

go out running look out the window and

22:42

go i wonder what the weather is oh minus

22:43

25.

22:44

oh oh you know they don't have that

22:47

debate with themselves

22:48

about their motivation they get their

22:50

shoes on they go out and run

22:52

and that's the way habits work is they

22:54

sit on top of motivation

22:57

so let's talk about some habits

23:00

meditation right how many people think i

23:02

should probably meditate

23:05

okay that's one of you okay so you all

23:07

need to read more

23:08

but um anyway so of all of the things

23:11

you can read in the psychology section

23:13

of the self-help section of your

23:15

bookstores you have that in denmark too

23:17

you're having california right you have

23:19

a self-help hex

23:20

a self-help bookstore in california size

23:22

of this room

23:24

and god knows they need it but um so

23:28

of all the things you can do meditation

23:29

is the one that reduces stress it

23:31

reduces mental illness it reduces

23:34

emotion control impulsivity decision

23:37

making creativity blah blah this is all

23:38

research based

23:39

right so all that that you see in

23:42

the

23:42

self-help section you can set that on

23:45

fire

23:46

and basically start meditating anyway

23:49

so a lot of people think they should

23:51

meditate more right so which is more

23:53

useful to you

23:53

if you were to meditate for an hour

23:57

on saturday or 10 minutes

24:01

six days a week which is better same

24:04

length of time

24:07

why is that

24:13

can you speak up can you speak up please

24:18

get the advantage of it in a wider range

24:21

instead of just

24:22

on that saturday okay cool

24:26

other idea yeah

24:35

what she said yeah

24:38

you have a habit you have a habit if i

24:41

can

24:41

do that for five minutes a day for seven

24:43

days that's 35 minutes right

24:45

it's much better than doing it for 35

24:46

minutes on the on sundays

24:48

much better yeah because i'm starting to

24:51

build a habit

24:52

and so one of the ways that you can work

24:53

with habits is to trick yourself and use

24:56

these things called mini habits

24:58

so one of the reasons that people don't

25:00

change behavior

25:01

is it looks too big meditation the dalai

25:05

lama does two hours a day well who's

25:07

going to do that right

25:09

who has time he gets up at four

25:11

meditates for an hour

25:13

reads the newspapers for two or three

25:14

hours and goes and meditates again i

25:16

don't even know

25:17

right so we can't do that but if we say

25:20

how many of you could spend a minute a

25:21

day

25:23

or five minutes a day we could right we

25:26

could find that

25:28

on the train or in an elevator in the

25:30

shower or whatever we can find

25:32

that sort of time by doing that you

25:34

begin to build up habits

25:36

and so this concept is called mini

25:37

habits so that's a good way

25:39

another way of changing habits is doing

25:42

something like a 30-day challenge

25:44

so this is pretty cool right

25:47

a lot of us don't change because you

25:49

think oh my god i have to do this for

25:50

the rest of my life

25:51

right try for 30 days play a little game

25:54

with yourself

25:56

could i change x for 30 days i've done

25:59

it with walking for example

26:01

uh i'm going to walk for 30 minutes a

26:03

day no matter what

26:05

and you know in colorado i live at uh

26:08

3000 meters or 2000 meters you know gets

26:11

pretty cold some days

26:12

i got home at 11 o'clock at night but i

26:14

was in this 30 day challenge so i went

26:16

out and walked for half an hour

26:17

and whatever you know it's no big deal

26:20

so by doing that it doesn't feel like a

26:22

life sentence but you still get the

26:23

benefit

26:25

so that's another trick to change habits

26:28

habits are sensitive to environmental

26:31

cues

26:32

so if you want to for example go out

26:34

walking and go out running

26:36

leave your trainers sneakers what do you

26:39

call them what do you call them in this

26:40

country

26:41

trainers sneakers shoes somewhere

26:43

training tennis shoes anyway

26:44

leave them uh on top of the television

26:49

so when you reach to turn on netflix you

26:51

think oh

26:52

you join tennis shoes you know what i

26:54

mean right some way or another you set

26:55

yourself a cue

26:57

that will promote the behavior that you

26:59

want to do

27:00

so you can do that

27:04

and it also works for mindsets

27:07

so when you're thinking about changing

27:09

your mind

27:10

you can also have a trigger when i think

27:13

x

27:15

i'm gonna shift my mind and do y

27:18

instead right so you can change habitual

27:22

patterns of thoughts by using

27:25

what's called implementation triggers

27:30

so designing behavioral change into

27:31

products this is one of these things

27:32

consultants love to do this

27:34

consultants love this stuff right they

27:36

put like an easy five-step process

27:38

diagram i don't mean pretend that it's

27:39

easy i don't mean to pretend it's linear

27:40

i don't mean to pretend it's

27:41

straightforward

27:42

i don't mean to pretend that there's all

27:43

the way to it they're all there is to it

27:45

but you want to be specific about the

27:47

behaviors you want to use mind space and

27:49

habits as checklists

27:51

to think about it you want to create

27:53

measures because one of the lovely

27:54

things about behaviors

27:55

is you can measure them yeah and you

27:58

want to learn

27:59

and reiterate

28:02

and i think this is really one of the

28:05

things that's exciting about half double

28:06

as you build behaviors into the start

28:09

so all of those other change models i

28:10

showed you

28:12

from the previous century from the

28:15

jurassic age

28:17

pre-half double and we should do that

28:20

actually we should have like instead of

28:21

anno domini

28:22

and bc we can have pre-half double and

28:25

after half double

28:26

it's a new specify

28:30

behaviors on the fart never ever assume

28:32

that you if you tell people something

28:34

no matter how persuasive and charismatic

28:36

you are

28:38

that you're going to change the behavior

28:39

never ever assume that

28:43

design them participatively so the only

28:45

sensible way to design behaviors

28:47

is to ask people who are going to have

28:49

to do it what sort of behaviors are

28:51

going to make the system work for you

28:52

we consultants with our knowledge

28:53

management machine with the new sierra

28:55

with the new crm system involve people

28:58

and help them co-design

29:01

this isn't cookbook stuff a lot of the

29:03

examples in mind space

29:04

are from the realm of public policy

29:08

they're measured they're evidence-based

29:11

they're research

29:12

based there's great case studies there

29:14

are fewer case studies in business

29:17

partly it's fun you get to be creative

29:21

and partly you have to do some of the

29:22

heavy lifting yourself you can't open a

29:24

cookbook and go

29:25

okay i want x behavior and so that means

29:28

i should do y

29:29

no not that easy

29:33

so you'll have to do some digging around

29:37

and then that's all for me mangataka

29:39

thank you stay here

Learn more about the other important factors in the Half Double Methodology and see other Half Double Video's by Thought Leader Ralf Muller, Thought Leader Dr. Aaron Shenhar and on governance of Projects.