Webinar - The Half Double Methodology

Get a first-hand insight into what we believe is the key to leading projects faster and with higher impact.
View Video On Vimeo
half double research webinar - Hear Professors from Aarhus University explain the research behind Half Double.

Based on the latest research in project management and on what works in practice, the simple but efficient project management methodology Half Double has been developed. The methodology consists of 3 core principles, 9 methods and tools which all together capture and fulfill the potential of your project when applied.

Information


At the webinar you can get inspired by a real-life case from the company GN Audio with the JABRA brand, which has cut down their time to market by applying core elements from the Half Double methodology. Who: Michael Ehlers: Partner at Implement Consulting Group. Michael is one of the Founding fathers of the Half Double methodology and the main driver of Half Double for the last 5 years.

Transcript 


 

00:01

hello and good morning everyone and

00:03

welcome to this

00:04

half double methodology webinar my name

00:06

is

00:07

michael ellers and i'll be i am the

00:10

project manager of

00:11

half double and i've been the project

00:13

manager of half double for the last five

00:14

years

00:15

i'm also partner in implement consulting

00:17

group and i've been working with

00:18

projects for the last 20 years

00:20

so projects is really my passion and

00:23

that is also the reason why i'm so

00:25

passionate about half double and

00:27

creating new methodologies

00:29

and this is actually what this session

00:31

is all about it's about a new

00:32

methodology

00:33

that we have co-created together with a

00:36

big community

00:37

and i'm gonna give you the insights to

00:39

what is this

00:40

uh methodology all about um but before i

00:44

kind of

00:44

dive into the whole methodology part i

00:46

just want to let you know that i have

00:49

behind me here i have a nice background

00:51

but i also have two other people

00:53

in the room i have patrick who will be

00:55

helping on the technical side and on the

00:57

chat side

00:58

and also have anna on the other side and

01:00

she'll be helping me

01:02

with the q's and a's that that might

01:04

come along

01:05

along this session so so we're actually

01:07

three people here in the room you'll

01:09

probably only see me today but

01:11

you interact with all of us hopefully

01:14

so i think it's time for us to to share

01:17

the agenda and patrick will help me to

01:19

to share the slides with all of you

01:23

and hopefully you you now see the

01:25

welcome to the half double seminar slide

01:27

which is the the introduction

01:29

and uh and the agenda for today is that

01:32

i'm gonna run through first of all

01:34

the overall story of half double so so

01:37

why did we even start this initiative

01:40

what's the idea behind it and and who

01:42

have put

01:43

who have contributed to to setting up

01:45

this whole methodology

01:47

then i'm gonna dive into the methodology

01:49

as such we're gonna talk about

01:51

impact flow and leadership the three

01:53

core elements of half double

01:55

then we will join into a case from g

01:59

audio who has the uh the brand jabra

02:02

they produce headsets and and uh

02:04

speakers for

02:05

um for for computers so as we'll see how

02:08

they have used half double and i'm going

02:10

to get

02:11

going to give you an insight to some of

02:12

that then we're going to end the session

02:15

with an online q a and actually you will

02:18

have the opportunity to use the q a

02:20

button all along this session

02:22

so in the bottom of your screen you'll

02:24

find a q a

02:25

uh kind of button and you can write your

02:28

questions

02:28

along this session and then anna will

02:30

help me

02:31

uh to figure out whether these questions

02:33

will be good to kind of handle along the

02:35

way

02:36

or whether some of them will be better

02:37

to handle in the final part of this

02:39

session

02:40

but feel free to write in your cues and

02:43

qs along this session

02:45

okay let's get started you know so why

02:48

did we even start

02:49

half double well it all started with

02:51

this number

02:52

the thirty percent thirty percent of all

02:54

projects today are characterized as

02:56

successful

02:57

so this number derives from the

02:59

standardised group they've been doing

03:01

this research from

03:02

1994 until today and the number has

03:06

actually

03:06

increased a little it has increased to

03:09

36 percent

03:10

so 36 of all the projects we're doing

03:13

today are actually successful

03:16

that's a good thing however it still

03:18

leaves

03:19

quite a lot of space to be even better

03:21

because we would like to have more

03:23

successful projects

03:24

because if we have more successful

03:26

projects we can actually

03:28

leverage the whole danish economy

03:30

because it turns out

03:32

that if you look into germany 34

03:35

of the german economy would be based on

03:38

actual projects

03:40

so one-third of the whole economy with a

03:42

success rate of 30

03:45

that was the issue that we're trying to

03:47

deal with we're actually trying to

03:49

increase

03:50

the success rate of projects so that's

03:52

how it all started in uh

03:54

2015 and um and and we started out with

03:57

this great idea about you know doing

03:59

something for project management

04:02

and we knew that this could probably be

04:04

solved with

04:05

impact flowing leadership at that point

04:07

but we didn't know how that could be

04:09

translated into a methodology we didn't

04:11

know you know whether it would work in

04:13

reality

04:14

so what we did was to invite 25 people

04:17

into a room

04:18

and we asked them whether these 25

04:21

people were the best project managers we

04:22

knew of at that point

04:24

and we asked them do you see this

04:25

problem they all said yes

04:27

and do you want to chip in and help us

04:29

to solve this problem

04:30

and they also said yes to that and then

04:33

it all started

04:34

today the 25 people have become 2 300

04:37

passionate practitioners

04:39

and they have you know most of them

04:42

contributed to creating the whole

04:44

methodology

04:45

um so so what we did was actually to to

04:47

identify

04:48

set 16 pilot projects where we wanted to

04:51

use the methodology

04:53

and then we applied the methodology to

04:55

real life projects

04:56

while we developed the methodology and

04:58

we did that

04:59

together with also three universities

05:02

because we asked the universities

05:03

to evaluate these 16 pilot projects

05:06

so the three universities as you would

05:09

see here on the

05:10

right side of the slide is oh university

05:13

the danish technical university and

05:15

copenhagen business school

05:16

so these three universities joined

05:19

together

05:19

in order to review some of the projects

05:22

that we did together with

05:23

these uh companies that you see on the

05:25

left side of the slide

05:27

so these are probably if you're ordained

05:29

uh pretty familiar brands for most of us

05:32

and um and and what we did was actually

05:34

to apply this

05:35

in real life business issues that they

05:38

had and see whether it would work or not

05:40

and here is the result of this of of the

05:43

16

05:44

pilot projects so the researchers they

05:47

looked into the 16 pilot projects and

05:49

the first thing that they looked into

05:51

was whether was whether the project

05:53

fulfilled the success criteria

05:55

or not so in 87

05:59

of the cases it actually turned out that

06:01

we fulfilled the success criteria to

06:03

some extent or to a high extent

06:05

so 87 of the cases were successful

06:09

the other number is the 69

06:13

the 69 percent is really the

06:16

comparison to similar projects in the

06:19

same organization

06:20

so for instance velux did a pilot

06:23

project

06:24

what the researchers did there was to

06:26

compare the pilot project that we did

06:28

with three similar projects envelopes

06:31

in that way they could see which project

06:33

created the most

06:34

impact and in 69 of the cases

06:38

the half double pilot project created

06:40

more impact than similar projects in the

06:42

same organization

06:44

so these are some of the uh some of the

06:46

results that we have right now

06:48

and also some of the results prove that

06:50

actually proves that this methodology

06:52

really works in reality

06:55

so before i dive into the actual

06:58

methodology

06:59

and and uh and elaborate on some of the

07:02

cases

07:02

then i would like you to consider this

07:05

question

07:05

for a second and we will put up a poll

07:08

in in a few

07:09

seconds as well so we would actually

07:11

like you to

07:12

to think about the success rate of

07:14

projects in your organization so if you

07:17

think you know

07:18

just use your gut feeling use your

07:19

insight if you even have numbers

07:21

you know and try to help us to to uh to

07:24

play along

07:25

and and answer this poll so we'll start

07:28

the poll

07:28

now and feel free to uh to plot in

07:32

where you think you know that your

07:34

organization would fit

07:36

in in these numbers and we will use this

07:38

as an interesting input for

07:40

seeing how well do you think that your

07:43

projects succeed

07:44

in out there

07:48

so i can see a few of you have started

07:51

voting which is so great

07:56

about half of you have been through the

07:58

question now

07:59

um there is a question here define

08:03

success first okay so while the uh

08:07

while the uh poll is going on uh

08:10

what is the measurement of success or

08:13

define what is success first

08:15

and i think that is a great question

08:18

because

08:18

what is success rate and in the s

08:22

in the study that we saw from the

08:23

standards group success rate would be

08:25

measured

08:26

in terms of did we deliver you know to

08:28

the con

08:29

the initial contract that we decided

08:31

upon so that would actually be

08:33

the classic triple constraint so so

08:36

the interesting thing here is that

08:37

success is is measured

08:39

in this a well in the study that i

08:41

showed before

08:42

in terms of did we deliver what we

08:44

promised so

08:45

that is that is the interesting thing at

08:47

least looking at that study

08:49

we think projects should be measured on

08:52

other success parameters for instance

08:54

do they create impact and i'll get back

08:56

to that in just a second

08:57

because let's have a look at the uh at

09:00

the poll

09:00

results so um so quite a few of you have

09:04

actually

09:04

put yourself kind of in the middle layer

09:06

there from from

09:08

41 to 60 so about half of you

09:12

experience or have a gut feeling that

09:15

that half of your projects

09:16

succeed pretty well then there would be

09:19

probably another half that that succeeds

09:21

that succeeds uh less well and if we

09:24

look at the combined numbers we can see

09:25

that there is a small tendency to have

09:28

more answers towards not succeeding

09:31

than than really succeeding so so this

09:34

is uh

09:35

this kind of confirms the number that we

09:37

saw from the start at least if we look

09:39

into

09:40

how you perceive uh the success rate at

09:42

this point

09:43

thank you very much for playing along

09:44

with this so um

09:46

i'm gonna go on with the presentation

09:49

and start

09:50

telling you a little about half double

09:52

and the methodology

09:54

as i said the half double methodology

09:57

is based on three core element

10:01

so these three core elements are impact

10:05

flow and leadership

10:08

and the three core elements are

10:10

essential in the way that each of them

10:13

actually represent a paradigm shift

10:15

compared to traditional project

10:17

management

10:18

so let's look at them one by one first

10:20

of all impact

10:22

the paradigm shift here is that in

10:24

traditional project management

10:26

you will be considered a success if you

10:28

deliver what you promised

10:30

so if you deliver according to the

10:33

initial contract that you created

10:35

then then then you would be a success it

10:38

doesn't matter whether people use this

10:40

whether you've created impact with it or

10:42

whether it works or not

10:44

as long as you have delivered what was

10:46

specified in the start of the project

10:48

then i as a project manager would be a

10:50

success

10:51

we think that perspective is wrong we

10:53

think that we should measure our project

10:55

in terms of how much impact do they

10:57

create what is the actual

10:59

value creation of our project which is

11:02

the reason why we're saying

11:04

half double should be based on impact

11:06

delivery

11:07

it should be based on actually managing

11:10

your projects or leading your project

11:11

towards the impact that we would like to

11:13

create

11:14

and the project should be measured upon

11:16

the impact that it creates

11:19

the second core element is flow when we

11:22

look into

11:23

the flow part in traditional project

11:25

management you would focus on

11:27

you know having a lot of people in your

11:29

project you would have what we call

11:31

a thin uh resource allocation

11:35

so people would probably participate in

11:37

quite a lot of projects at the same time

11:40

so you might be 10 allocated to a

11:42

project which actually creates

11:44

less progression in the project so what

11:46

we are saying with half double

11:48

is that we would like to have a flow in

11:50

the project we would like to make sure

11:52

that our project progress every week and

11:55

the reason why

11:56

we would like the project to progress

11:57

every week are actually twofold

12:00

first of all we finish the project

12:02

quicker if we have a flow every week

12:04

a progression every week and the second

12:06

thing is that

12:07

all projects consist of people and

12:10

people are motivated by progression

12:12

so it is the best way to motivate people

12:15

if we have actual progression in our

12:17

project

12:18

if we have no progression the opposite

12:21

thing will happen

12:22

people will become disengaged and that

12:24

is what traditional projects to

12:26

sometimes

12:26

to some extent suffer from that we're

12:28

working on too many projects at the same

12:30

time

12:31

so with flow we actually recommend that

12:34

you only work on two projects at the

12:35

same time

12:36

and you utilize half the time in one

12:38

project and another 50 percent of your

12:40

time in another project in that way we

12:43

can create a

12:44

constant progression the last

12:47

core element is leadership leadership

12:51

is a paradigm shift from project

12:53

management

12:55

to project leadership well it is called

12:58

project management for a very good

13:00

reason

13:00

because it was founded in the 1960s in

13:03

the american weapon industry

13:04

and in the space industry and project

13:07

management were

13:08

founded by great engineers who did

13:10

everything they could

13:11

to foresee the unforeseeable so they

13:14

made great systems

13:15

to kind of figure out you know how can

13:18

we foresee the future how can we break

13:19

down

13:20

the project into smaller so they

13:21

become manageable

13:24

what we're saying is you know that is a

13:26

great thing but we need to start

13:27

somewhere else

13:28

we need to start with the leadership

13:30

because all projects consist of people

13:32

so let's start with the leadership and

13:34

then we will add the management

13:36

later on so what we're claiming is that

13:39

you would have two central people who

13:42

will be in charge of the leadership of

13:43

the project you have a project owner

13:45

and a project leader and what we would

13:48

like to see here would be an

13:50

informal or what we would call a dynamic

13:53

duo going on between the project owner

13:55

and the project leader

13:56

they will be the batman and robin who

13:58

will you know fight for this project to

14:00

make it happen

14:02

and that's the leadership that we would

14:03

like to have in projects and i'm going

14:05

to elaborate a little more on that

14:06

because

14:07

we think it should also be a little more

14:10

informal

14:11

as opposed to the very foremost theory

14:13

committee meetings

14:14

that might be going on in some of your

14:16

projects where you will

14:18

and well you will see your steering

14:19

committee every second month and you

14:20

will see them for half an hour and

14:22

they'll give you a thumb up or thumbs

14:23

down

14:24

on this status meeting so we'll try to

14:26

make that quite different with half

14:28

double

14:29

so impact flow and leadership the three

14:32

core elements that we will dive

14:34

further into in this session but why did

14:37

we call it

14:38

half double well it is pretty simple

14:41

we are trying to create double the

14:43

impact in half the time

14:45

so the name actually is about what we do

14:48

in the projects

14:49

and in traditional projects you will

14:52

usually have an initiation

14:53

then you would execute the project and

14:55

then

14:56

somewhere in the end of the project you

14:58

will launch something from the project

15:00

that will start creating value

15:02

and then the project stops and everyone

15:04

leaves and the value creation is left to

15:06

no one

15:06

so what we think is the right way to do

15:09

projects would be

15:10

to learn something from the project in

15:13

half the time that we would usually

15:14

launch something so we are trying to cut

15:17

the time to

15:18

impact in half because if we start

15:21

creating impact while we do the project

15:23

we will actually

15:24

create a positive stakeholder cycle that

15:27

will help the project

15:28

or we will gain feedback that what we're

15:30

doing is totally wrong

15:31

and then we will adjust so that is the

15:34

main idea

15:35

behind running your project like this

15:37

get in touch

15:39

with you know your stakeholders your key

15:41

stakeholders as quickly as possible

15:43

launch something that they can use so

15:45

that they can try it out

15:46

to give you feedback and start doing

15:48

value creation while you do the project

15:51

and of course this is not something that

15:53

we have invented in half double this is

15:55

something that comes from

15:56

agile mindset and it is what is known as

15:59

the mvp

16:00

the minimum viable product meaning you

16:02

launch a minimum viable product from the

16:04

project

16:05

as soon as possible so we of course

16:08

think about that also and and use that

16:11

thinking

16:11

but we do not see this thinking in a lot

16:14

of projects

16:15

so what we're saying is all projects

16:18

that will use this

16:19

methodology should work like this

16:21

launching something as early as possible

16:23

so that is where half double is really

16:25

strong

16:26

so you might ask okay so mvps come from

16:30

agile so what is half double how do you

16:32

position

16:33

half double well let me make this simple

16:36

half double is an

16:37

agile hybrid and that means that

16:41

half double is an agile approach that is

16:43

made for

16:44

non-software projects so it is very

16:47

suitable for for instance

16:48

product development projects supply

16:50

chain projects

16:51

or other internal development projects

16:55

we think half double is really good for

16:57

transformation

16:58

projects so if you have what might be

17:01

called a

17:02

predefined project a project where you

17:05

know a lot from the start

17:07

then probably traditional methods would

17:09

be good for your project

17:10

but if you have a project where you are

17:12

really very uncertain and

17:14

very unsure about what to deliver and

17:16

what the actual purpose of this project

17:18

is

17:18

then half double would be a great

17:20

approach or great choice of methodology

17:22

for that project

17:23

so that is why we call it an agile

17:25

hybrid

17:26

and because most agile thoughts really

17:30

derives from

17:31

software development and we have used

17:33

this methodology

17:34

for non-software projects it also works

17:37

in software projects to

17:38

to to underline that but but it is

17:41

specifically made to make sure that

17:43

the needs of non-software projects are

17:46

met

17:47

so that is where half double is at its

17:49

best

17:52

so half double what will it be and and

17:55

how can i do it what will i do in my

17:57

project this is

17:59

the overview that you'll be seeing quite

18:01

a few times

18:02

throughout this presentation half double

18:05

consists

18:06

of the three core element impact flow

18:09

and leadership as you see on the slides

18:12

and each of these core elements would

18:14

have

18:15

three methods and three tools associated

18:18

with it

18:19

so the method would be the way that you

18:21

approach

18:23

your your project and the tool would be

18:25

the tool that you can use

18:27

to help this method come alive and each

18:30

of the core elements would have a

18:32

principle associated with it

18:34

so what we do with a half double project

18:36

is really to

18:37

make the principle come alive in the

18:39

project and if you make can make the

18:41

three principles for impactful

18:43

leadership come alive and i'll run

18:45

through them in this session

18:46

then you're actually half double so that

18:49

is the way that we try to

18:51

implement half double in our projects or

18:53

to make the local translation

18:54

we try to tailor or at least translate

18:57

the principle

18:58

into the actual project and the actual

19:00

organization

19:01

and then we use the methods and the

19:03

tools if we have nothing else to use

19:05

and that is also why you have a rim

19:07

around the whole concept called local

19:09

translation

19:10

because we think that the local

19:11

translation of the tools that i'm going

19:13

to run through

19:14

in this session um is is is

19:18

very important to tailor to your

19:20

organization and your project

19:21

to the specific needs of your project

19:25

so that is the overall approach

19:28

three core elements each with a

19:30

principle and then

19:31

nine things that we suggest that you do

19:34

in your project

19:35

in order to create more impact in

19:36

shorter time

19:39

and i think that is really one of the

19:41

forces or strength

19:42

with half double we're saying that you

19:44

only need to do nine things

19:46

in your project in order to succeed so

19:48

we try to simplify

19:50

everything that you would have learned

19:52

about project management and

19:54

and do and simplify it into nine things

19:56

that we should do different

19:57

we know for a fact that you need to do

19:59

more than this but we also know if you

20:01

start with these nine things

20:03

you're pretty well on the way and

20:05

research have now shown

20:06

that we are pretty good on creating

20:08

impact with these nine things

20:10

so let me dive into them i will start

20:12

with the impact domain then i'm gonna

20:14

run through the flow domain

20:16

and then i'm gonna run through the

20:17

leadership domain

20:20

let's look into the impact part

20:24

the principle for creating impact is to

20:26

make sure

20:27

that stakeholder satisfaction is the

20:29

ultimate success criteria

20:32

so your project will be measured upon

20:34

whether

20:35

your key stakeholders are satisfied with

20:37

your project

20:38

and what you deliver or not and the only

20:41

way to figure out

20:42

how they are satisfied would be to make

20:44

a pulse with them

20:45

so we make a monthly pulse check with

20:48

our key stakeholders

20:49

to make sure that we're on the right

20:51

track in terms of creating impact

20:53

and in terms of creating progression and

20:55

in terms of creating motivation and

20:57

development

20:58

so we ask our key stakeholders five

21:00

basic questions

21:02

every month just to make sure that we're

21:04

on the right track with this project

21:07

if we would like to create stakeholder

21:08

satisfaction then we need to know

21:10

what is impact in this project and how

21:13

can we

21:14

gain this impact so in order to figure

21:17

out how we will create impact

21:19

we create what we call an impact case

21:21

and as you see on the

21:22

left side of the slide there is a tool

21:25

associated with the impact case

21:27

the impact case is essentially a process

21:30

where we try or it's a it's a tool where

21:32

we try to combine

21:34

the actual business impact that we are

21:36

hoping to create

21:38

and combine that and link it with the

21:40

behavioral impact or the behavioral

21:42

change that need to be installed

21:44

in order to create the base business

21:46

impact

21:47

so the impact case is really the link

21:50

between behavioral change

21:53

and the business impact that we would

21:54

like to create

21:56

i see a lot of business cases in my work

21:59

as a consultant

22:00

but i don't see a lot of behavioral

22:02

change cases

22:03

linked to the business cases and that is

22:05

very essential

22:06

we think that you should be totally

22:09

clear on what's the behavioral change

22:11

that we need to install

22:12

and work on that iteratively along the

22:15

project in order to create impact

22:19

so that actually leads me to the second

22:20

tool or to the second

22:23

method method which you'll find in the

22:25

middle of the slide which we call the

22:26

impact solution design

22:28

and the impact solution design is a

22:30

process that will help you

22:32

to figure out how should we slice that

22:35

part

22:35

this project in order to create impact

22:38

as quickly as possible

22:40

so this process is initially a five

22:42

workshop process that you run through

22:44

with key stakeholders

22:45

to make sure that you have a great idea

22:48

for how to execute the project

22:50

and let me show you an example of how

22:52

this could be

22:54

so um this is in the upper part you will

22:57

see the more traditional

22:58

approach to a project you're building a

23:00

car so because we want to build a car we

23:02

start with building the wheels we put in

23:04

the engine

23:05

we put on the body and you know in a

23:07

year from now we might have a car

23:09

that will be able to drive then we're

23:11

done everyone is happy

23:13

or at least we have delivered what we

23:14

promised what we

23:16

suggest is instead to approach the

23:19

project as we

23:20

do in the bottom of the slide so we're

23:22

suggesting to look into what are you

23:24

really delivering here

23:26

because you're not delivering a car

23:27

you're delivering transportation from

23:29

a to b and if you're delivering

23:31

transportation from a to b

23:33

then maybe a skateboard could be the

23:36

suitable

23:37

kind of product for some of the

23:39

stakeholders

23:40

maybe the scooter maybe the bicycle

23:43

maybe

23:44

the motorcycle will be enough we will

23:47

that's why we would like to

23:48

build up the project in smaller bits to

23:51

see if our

23:52

if our stakeholders are satisfied with

23:54

whatever we're delivering along the way

23:56

because that is the characteristic of

23:58

all projects

23:59

we're not sure how they will end up so

24:02

why

24:02

specify something in details that we're

24:05

not that certain about

24:06

so that's why we try to build the

24:08

project in smaller bits

24:10

that will be valuable for some of the

24:13

users or customers related to whatever

24:16

we're doing in our project

24:18

this is what we call the impact solution

24:20

design

24:21

so we try actually to build our project

24:23

into delivering these

24:25

impact bits and as you can see this is a

24:28

slide from the minimum viable product

24:30

and again we're just taking all the good

24:32

things that are out there and using them

24:34

in half double

24:35

but also trying to relate them to

24:37

non-software projects

24:40

and what we suggest is really to do this

24:41

process very much up front

24:43

so what is specific and different about

24:46

half double

24:47

is that you start the project with an

24:49

impact solution design process

24:51

so instead of doing which would be kind

24:53

of the upper

24:54

part of the slide the normal initiation

24:57

instead of

24:58

rushing to execution after having

25:00

thought about what project you will be

25:02

doing

25:02

and been thinking about this for way too

25:04

long so everyone is

25:06

totally stressed about where we haven't

25:08

started yet

25:09

so we rush to execution and then the

25:11

whole weekly course

25:12

starts with our project what we're

25:14

suggesting is

25:15

start the weekly course very early in

25:17

the project by involving some of your

25:19

key stakeholders

25:21

into this five workshop process where

25:23

you define

25:24

what is a skateboard what is a scooter

25:27

in this case you know and how could we

25:30

how could we slice our project into

25:32

those smaller bits

25:33

so we we actually do a kind of a

25:37

a innovation sprint start of our project

25:40

where we invite most of our stakeholders

25:42

to figure out what would they like we

25:44

ask customers we also ask technical

25:46

people you know

25:47

will this ever be feasible and then we

25:50

designed the project to be built up

25:52

in a value creation uh mode so that is

25:55

the secret of impact solution design and

25:57

let me tell you the slide looks very

25:59

simple when i showed you

26:01

this slide with the car and so forth but

26:04

converting this thinking into whatever

26:06

project you might have

26:08

is really where the gold is and that is

26:10

the local translation

26:12

that is so necessary and that will

26:13

require reflective practitioners

26:16

hopefully like you guys out there on

26:18

your own projects

26:19

and i'll get back to the part about

26:21

reflective practitioners

26:22

when we get to the leadership

26:25

so this is uh nils newmark two spark

26:28

from uh

26:29

from jabra from g audio he was

26:32

the senior project uh manager of one of

26:35

our

26:36

pilot projects in uh in gnojo

26:39

jabra and um and and these are some of

26:42

his

26:43

uh statements on uh on how it was to use

26:46

impact in in his project you will find

26:49

this

26:49

video online actually at the

26:52

at half double institute dot org where

26:56

you can see the whole video with nils

26:57

it's one and a half minute

26:59

um i've chosen not to show it in this

27:01

webinar because video

27:03

sometimes is a bad experience for you

27:04

guys out there because

27:06

depending on whatever connection you

27:08

might have it works

27:10

very bad for some of you and good for

27:11

some of you so we've chosen not to take

27:13

it

27:14

but you can see the video afterwards if

27:16

you like to and what he said

27:18

about doing projects with this mindset

27:21

was

27:21

it was very nice to set clear goals on

27:24

how the project is going to be

27:25

successful

27:26

and how to create impact from the start

27:29

and how they did that was really to

27:31

involve the leadership team

27:33

and also the marketing team and the

27:35

sales team in what were their

27:37

expectations to this product

27:39

and what they were building were

27:40

actually um small headsets that you can

27:43

put into your ears

27:44

so you can connect with your phone and

27:45

take your call from that

27:47

and and how they usually do that is a

27:49

very engineering focused

27:51

exercise so they of course start with

27:54

the technical

27:55

part of it and they start exploring how

27:57

can we build this

27:58

smaller and better and more efficiently

28:01

but this time

28:02

we started by figuring out what's the

28:03

value that we would like to create first

28:05

of all for the users

28:06

but very much also in terms of what's

28:08

the revenue

28:09

what's the market share that we hope to

28:11

gain from this product

28:13

and how might we capture that market

28:16

share

28:17

by adjusting our product to to that

28:20

market

28:20

niche that would be out there so

28:22

inviting a lot of people from marketing

28:24

from concepting and from other parts of

28:27

the organization to figure out how this

28:29

project

28:29

should be actually sold and tailored and

28:32

understood was kind of the start of the

28:35

project and then the

28:36

technical part followed afterwards so

28:39

they actually twisted those two things

28:41

totally around which really made a lot

28:44

in

28:44

in this project

28:48

so now it's time to ask you about

28:51

your ways of using some of these ideas

28:54

in your project

28:56

and what i would like you to uh to to

28:58

consider

28:59

is to what extent are you really crisp

29:02

and clear on the impact creation

29:04

of your own project so try to be you

29:07

know dead honest we won't follow up on

29:08

these anxious anyway so

29:10

so so so it's totally an anonymic

29:14

uh so so you know try to be honest with

29:16

yourself are you really crisp and clear

29:19

on the impact creation on your project

29:20

or are you just crisp on the deliverable

29:23

of your project which would be a good

29:25

thing you know

29:26

no doubt about that but let's see kind

29:28

of uh how you fall

29:30

out on this because what we see is that

29:33

uh that that we the project leader is

29:37

usually pretty

29:38

kind of involved in the impact creation

29:40

and would know it

29:41

but the stakeholders associated with the

29:43

pro with the project

29:45

would be more you know occupied with the

29:47

actual deliverable

29:48

so so it is it is actually hard to be

29:51

the

29:51

impact owner and the impact creator of a

29:54

project

29:55

so let's see kind of how this falls out

29:57

i'm just going to have a sip of water

29:58

while we look into the result

30:03

quite a lot of you have answered the

30:04

question i think we're going to

30:06

end the poll and share the results

30:11

so these are the results about uh

30:14

75 uh 57 percent of you have said to

30:19

some extent

30:21

18 18 to a low extent and actually 25 to

30:24

a high extent

30:25

so we have a tendency towards at least

30:28

one-fourth of you think that due to a

30:30

high extent know what the value creation

30:32

of your project would be

30:34

which is very positive and some of you

30:36

are kind of in between and then of

30:38

course

30:38

a few of you not you know to to to a low

30:42

extent

30:42

were aware about the impact vision of

30:44

your project

30:45

and regarding this poll i just want to

30:48

say that

30:50

i know that impact creation is not the

30:52

project

30:53

leader alone or not alone for the

30:55

project leader to decide

30:56

it is very much about what kind of

30:58

project you are doing what the

30:59

organization is actually asking you to

31:01

deliver

31:02

so i know that this is a bigger thing

31:04

it's really an organizational mindset

31:06

that we need to install here

31:08

but thank you very much for playing

31:09

along and i think that the uh

31:11

if 50 57 really shows that that

31:15

we can improve this approach quite a lot

31:20

now it's time to dive into the second

31:23

core element which is flow and uh

31:27

and the flow part of a project also

31:29

consists of

31:30

three different methods and the

31:33

principle

31:34

that we try to fulfill with flow is

31:36

really to make sure that we have a

31:37

high intensity and frequent interaction

31:40

in our project

31:40

because that will ensure a continuous

31:43

project progression

31:45

so in our projects we try to allocate

31:48

our team

31:48

with 50 core resources saying only two

31:52

projects per person

31:53

we try to create a rhythm and key events

31:55

making sure that we have all the

31:56

meetings set up and that people work on

31:58

the same day

31:59

in the same room and then we use visual

32:02

planning in order to progress the

32:04

project as much as possible and make

32:05

sure that everyone commits

32:07

to what they're doing and this is you

32:10

know some of the

32:11

basic facts that we have based this on

32:13

we actually know that

32:15

when we when we do five projects at the

32:17

same time we have a 30

32:19

efficiency and when we do two projects

32:22

at the same time we have an

32:23

80 efficiency so the reason for this is

32:26

of course that

32:27

if you if you um if you if you only have

32:31

two projects you are able to

32:32

focus on the things that you're doing

32:34

and you're and you will avoid the

32:36

multitasking

32:37

between five different projects at the

32:39

same time

32:40

so running your projects in a more

32:42

intense

32:43

uh character will help you to finish

32:45

them quicker

32:46

and the second thing here is really that

32:48

when you're doing knowledge work

32:51

then you really need time to get into

32:53

flow in solving these

32:54

complex hard challenges you cannot solve

32:57

them you know

32:58

five minutes here ten minutes there you

33:00

need to dive in for at least half a day

33:02

for at least three or four hours in

33:04

order to solve some of these complex

33:06

issues

33:06

and then you're dependent on other

33:08

people so why don't you go into the same

33:10

room

33:10

and you know elaborate and do some of

33:13

these things together and this is

33:15

actually what you see on the slide here

33:16

you see in teams who are engaging with

33:19

each other

33:20

who are taking time to meet on let's say

33:22

mondays and tuesdays

33:24

to work on their project and then on

33:26

wednesday they present it to their

33:27

project owner

33:28

and to some of the key stakeholders and

33:30

then on the next half of wednesday

33:33

thursday and friday they work on their

33:34

second project so

33:36

they set it up very roughly or very very

33:39

kind of

33:40

firmly but working this way really

33:42

progresses the project and creates

33:43

a lot of uh commitment to the project

33:47

and this is henning henson he's the

33:50

senior director of project management in

33:52

benfast

33:53

they have also been using the halftop

33:55

methodology and especially

33:57

the flow part of of half double in their

33:59

projects

34:00

and what he says and you can also see

34:02

this video online at half double

34:04

institute.org

34:06

is is that sprints create intensity and

34:08

focus

34:09

so so it really helps the project to

34:11

progress but it is also very motivating

34:13

for the team to get feedback

34:15

that enables fast decisions all along

34:17

the way

34:18

so so that is really the secret of half

34:20

double to

34:21

make sure that you know what kind of

34:23

impact you would like to create

34:24

and then execute it in intensified

34:27

sprints

34:28

and this is how it will look like in a

34:30

life cycle of a half double project

34:32

you will actually in the start you will

34:35

be doing this weekly course with the

34:36

workshops that you see in the start

34:38

where you will invite stakeholders from

34:40

different parts of the organization and

34:42

your leadership skills as a project

34:44

leader will be challenged immensely

34:46

but that is the great and the beauty of

34:48

being a half double project leader

34:49

so you will in that process you will

34:51

define how can we create

34:53

impact and then you will initiate

34:55

sprints

34:56

which will usually be a month it could

34:58

also be six weeks it could be two weeks

35:00

where you will create some of these

35:02

intensive

35:03

uh small mvps minimum viable products

35:07

that you will launch

35:08

so that you can get feedback from your

35:10

uh stakeholders

35:12

in terms of what you're doing so that is

35:14

also why we have the leadership

35:16

part running all along the project in

35:18

the bottom there you will see that the

35:20

project owner and the project leader

35:22

needs to do this together and be

35:24

involved in the project together in

35:26

order to set it up like this

35:27

and intensely progress the project

35:31

and that actually leaves me with the

35:33

leadership part

35:34

of of half double so in the leadership

35:37

part of half double

35:38

we have the principle that in leadership

35:41

you must embrace uncertainty and make

35:43

the project happen

35:44

so what we try to do with this principle

35:46

is really to

35:47

make sure that everyone understand that

35:50

all projects are learning journeys

35:52

we start out with a low amount of

35:54

knowledge and by the

35:55

end of the project we know everything

35:57

about the project and we would have

35:59

wished we knew that from the start

36:01

but the essence of projects is that we

36:03

need to

36:04

figure that out we need to create that

36:06

insight as the project progress

36:08

and that is why the leadership of the

36:11

whole project must embrace the big

36:13

uncertainty

36:14

that is associated with doing projects

36:16

but then again

36:17

this uncertainty cannot be a kind of a

36:20

bad excuse for doing nothing

36:22

or doing analysis again and again we

36:24

need to do something we need to start

36:25

doing what we think

36:27

initially will be the right way to

36:29

approach this

36:30

so we need a very strong project leader

36:33

to do this

36:34

we need a project leader who will be

36:36

capable of embracing

36:38

this uncertainty and facilitate

36:40

stakeholders

36:42

throughout this journey and make sure

36:44

that we together create something that

36:46

will create

36:47

satisfaction for customers and other

36:50

stakeholders related to this project

36:53

the other role associated with the

36:55

leadership

36:56

is the active project owner and the

36:59

active project owner

37:01

is really a person who will be showing

37:04

up at your project

37:05

every week for two hours helping to

37:08

engage in the project making sure that

37:10

we push towards impact

37:12

making sure that that that we create a

37:15

great impact solution design

37:16

with a great idea for building up like

37:18

skateboards

37:20

mode mopeds cycles motorcycles and cars

37:23

and who would actually own that impact

37:25

and be engaged in the project and wanted

37:27

to have it

37:28

which is why we are saying that project

37:30

owners can only be part of three

37:32

projects at the same time

37:33

so in the same way that you as a project

37:36

leader or as a core team member

37:38

can only work on two projects at the

37:39

same time the project

37:41

owner or the sponsor who might some

37:43

might call

37:44

this person should have only three

37:46

projects at the same time and should

37:48

engage

37:49

intensively with the project team

37:52

so we're saying only three projects for

37:54

owner and then leave the rest of your

37:56

projects to your great colleagues

37:57

so you own three projects and then you

37:59

leave the rest to your great colleagues

38:01

i wanna know that this is a hard thing

38:04

but it actually

38:04

works what you see here is econ booklets

38:08

jensen

38:09

he's from linux one of our pilot project

38:12

organizations and he actually tried this

38:15

he said

38:15

okay i'll meet up two hours every week

38:19

in the project room push for impact make

38:21

sure that you know the project create

38:23

whatever they need and get the decisions

38:26

that they need

38:27

whenever you know every week so that

38:29

they have the progression

38:30

that that the project would would entail

38:33

and what has

38:34

what was the result of this actually

38:35

that they cut off 30 percent of their

38:38

project lead time

38:39

not just because egon was doing his job

38:41

but because

38:42

he helped to push the team and he

38:44

created better communication

38:46

and there was actually less time wasted

38:48

so a lot of his decision making went

38:50

into a very

38:51

informal setting where he actually

38:53

engaged with the team and asked what

38:55

they thought

38:56

and then they just took the decision

38:57

right there in the room and the team

38:59

progressed

39:00

and that made a huge difference again

39:03

this video is also online at

39:05

halfdoubleinstitute.org but let me ask

39:08

you

39:09

how does this look in your organization

39:11

so

39:12

to what extent is your sponsor or your

39:15

project or

39:15

involved in your project for at least

39:17

two hours every week

39:19

i will now launch a new poll and please

39:22

help me to

39:23

answer some of these some of these uh

39:26

questions

39:39

so quite a few of you are answering the

39:41

poll right now

39:43

and i can tell you that

39:46

this is really one of the toughest parts

39:50

of most projects because there is a

39:52

tendency that

39:53

project owners have a hard time

39:55

delegating

39:56

meaning that they would all like to be

39:58

part of the same projects

40:00

and we have pretty big steering

40:01

committees usually

40:03

surrounded with projects because all

40:05

people would like to be involved

40:06

and have a you know decision making part

40:08

of it but that doesn't fulfill the

40:10

project owner role which would be a

40:12

person who's

40:12

very closely engaged with the project

40:14

and as you can see here

40:16

60 percent of you had said to a low

40:18

extent is your project sponsor involved

40:20

and the interesting thing here is that

40:23

that is a very

40:24

known fact actually and this is also

40:26

confirmed by by the

40:27

by your answers here but but the

40:30

interesting thing is that there's been

40:31

made quite a lot of uh studies related

40:33

to this which is called

40:35

critical success factory studies so what

40:37

are the factors

40:38

that actually create successful projects

40:42

and a lot of factors have been named

40:45

but the only common denominator in all

40:48

these studies

40:48

is that the active project owner was

40:51

accessible

40:52

all was part of the project so we

40:53

actually know that that this role means

40:55

a lot

40:56

so if you could change the 60 to nothing

40:59

then we can make a huge change and i

41:01

know that this might not be

41:03

for you for yourself to decide this but

41:05

at least you can try to push it a little

41:08

all right so that was the project owner

41:11

part and also the leadership part

41:13

what i would like to tell you about now

41:15

is what we call the local translation of

41:17

half double

41:18

so i've been through the three core

41:20

elements i've been through the nine

41:22

tools or methods

41:23

and as i said in the start it is so

41:25

important that you

41:27

translate this into the project that

41:29

you're in and the

41:30

and the context that you're in meaning

41:31

the organization that you're in

41:33

and i would like to share with you how

41:35

we did this in the

41:36

jabra project which is uh which is the

41:39

one that that

41:40

i showed you previously with uh with

41:42

with nils

41:43

so uh so nils was one out of uh three

41:46

pilot projects

41:48

where we started working like this in uh

41:50

in jabra

41:51

and uh and and so so nils was kind of

41:53

the early test of this

41:55

and that is why he said in jeopardy we

41:57

started half doubling r

41:58

d and now we're rolling out to all parts

42:01

of the organization

42:02

so we tested it in three r d projects

42:05

and then we started rolling it out to

42:06

the rest of the organization

42:08

and the way that we did this was

42:10

actually with

42:12

these three elements here so in

42:15

jabra we actually launched a common

42:18

language

42:19

model so it was kind of a way of

42:22

working model and we called it the

42:25

impact

42:25

model and the impact model actually

42:28

consisted

42:29

of three domains the first domain was

42:33

decision making and in this domain we

42:36

made sure that

42:37

answers for how should we collaborate

42:39

empower and escalate

42:41

in our projects was made totally clear

42:44

so

42:44

all projects could work in the same way

42:47

the second thing was the development

42:49

flow so we created a development throw

42:53

flow that all projects should kind of

42:55

walk through

42:56

and this development throw actually a

42:58

flow actually answered the question of

43:00

how will we go from the

43:02

opportunity that we have until we have

43:04

actually launched a product

43:06

so we have at that point they had about

43:09

i

43:09

think they had about 20 different gates

43:12

that you needed to progress through

43:14

when when you needed to to do a project

43:16

and we cut that down into

43:18

four overall gates that you needed to go

43:21

through because

43:22

then there would be more kind of

43:24

empowering to the project instead of

43:27

making it into a project portfolio

43:29

discussion uh

43:30

every time so the last thing that we

43:33

looked into were the tools trains and

43:35

template domain

43:36

and that domain actually uh concerned

43:39

with which free

43:40

tools do we share and and which training

43:43

do we create and offer

43:44

in terms of making sure that we all have

43:46

this common language

43:48

and let me show you a a few samples of

43:51

of this actually we did this the half

43:53

double way so for each of these three

43:55

domains

43:56

we had three different elements that

43:58

were associated with them

44:00

and in this slide that i'm showing you

44:02

here i will show you one element from

44:04

each of the uh from from each of the

44:06

domains

44:07

to give you a flavor about how we

44:09

approach this

44:10

so what we did was actually to merge

44:13

half double principles

44:14

into this way of working so for instance

44:16

in the development flow

44:18

as i said before we reduce 20 gauge to

44:21

four

44:21

gates and in the same moment we also

44:24

said that

44:25

all projects should start with a clear

44:27

process for

44:28

how to start up projects and that

44:31

process was built was was actually an

44:33

an elaborated impact solution design

44:36

process

44:36

and the process was actually built on uh

44:40

well it was uh it was it was uh founded

44:43

on build measure learn

44:45

uh cycles so iterative learning inspired

44:48

by uh

44:49

by eric ries and and and some of these

44:52

processes were actually to

44:54

to start by making the impact case the

44:56

next step would be to make the

44:58

assumption that so which assumptions are

45:00

we creating here

45:01

that seems very important to prove or or

45:04

disprove

45:05

very early on and then they define what

45:07

would be the minimum viable product that

45:09

we could launch from this product

45:11

based on these assumptions based on this

45:13

impact case and in this case

45:15

most of the minimum viable products were

45:17

actually insights

45:18

in very important product knowledge for

45:20

instance can we build this feature

45:22

is it is it viable that we can build

45:24

this feature that is a very important

45:26

part of the product

45:27

so we actually built a minimum viable

45:29

product for the features that seem to be

45:32

the most important ones for the headset

45:35

that they were producing

45:36

so the whole development flow was

45:38

actually started with this

45:40

impact solution design which essentially

45:42

were three iterations

45:43

of starting up the project making it

45:46

more more clever before we

45:47

decided now let's make the big

45:49

investment the second thing that we

45:51

decided to do

45:52

was to set up the project decision

45:55

making a little more clear

45:57

so previously they in in japan they had

46:00

the

46:01

20 gates as i said and that make gave a

46:03

tendency for the project portfolio board

46:06

to be very involved in each of the

46:08

product

46:09

projects decisions so so what we did

46:12

instead was to

46:13

to minimize the gates but then again

46:16

make sure that the sponsor team related

46:19

to the project

46:20

became much more empowered and had a lot

46:22

more than more decision making

46:25

related to running the project bear in

46:27

mind that these projects are project

46:29

organizations

46:30

that will that will um embrace about

46:33

50 to 80 people so it's it's quite big

46:36

organizations

46:37

and quite big projects quite big

46:39

investments so

46:40

in the sponsor team here we had to make

46:42

a cross-functional team consisting of

46:44

five different representatives

46:46

and those representatives chose one

46:49

project owner in that team

46:51

who should be the engaging and and

46:54

uh and active project owner so that was

46:57

the way that we addressed the half

46:58

double principle of the project owner in

47:00

that setup

47:01

and then the last part was to to choose

47:03

some

47:04

some some very simple tools and

47:05

templates also to figure out which

47:07

systems do we work in and and we set up

47:10

a few templates where we said let's make

47:12

a few templates that everyone use

47:14

instead of a lot of templates that no

47:16

one uses so we set it up in a very

47:18

simple way and made sure that everyone

47:20

for instance delivered an

47:21

impact case as that was one out of five

47:24

key templates

47:26

so that was the way that we try to

47:27

approach this and this is the result

47:29

in nils's project so um nil said that uh

47:34

the jabra headset that they built for

47:36

for the small uh

47:38

that you can put into your ears they had

47:40

a 50

47:41

longer battery time it's 20 smaller in

47:43

size and it's the most comfortable

47:45

experience that they've ever delivered

47:47

so in many ways uh the half double

47:50

approach have proved its way in their

47:52

organization

47:53

which is also the reason why they're

47:54

rolling it out to

47:56

to all of their projects currently

47:59

so that was the gn audio jabra

48:02

case and and also i think we actually

48:06

have had a presentation from this

48:08

from our uh from our conference lately

48:10

and we will soon launch a video where

48:12

you will hear uh klaus

48:14

uh klaus yeah tell his story

48:17

about uh how all these uh things were

48:20

set up and

48:20

came together so so you can certainly

48:23

hear his story

48:24

as well so now i've told you

48:28

about why we started this how you can do

48:31

it

48:31

and i think it's time for us to inspire

48:33

you on your next step before we go into

48:35

the q a

48:36

so what could be your next step well it

48:38

would be

48:39

an easy first step to go into the

48:42

halfdouble institute.org and download

48:45

the methodology

48:46

you can download it for free it's an

48:49

open source methodology it is co-created

48:51

by a

48:52

big community and it's open to everyone

48:54

so

48:55

you know please feel free to download

48:56

the methodology read the handbook

48:59

see you know how it will work out in

49:01

your organization

49:02

and if you need help you know let us

49:04

know because sometimes you can

49:06

you can use the community to share

49:08

knowledge but you can also of course

49:09

contact me

49:10

and get some more insight into how can

49:13

you set this up

49:14

if you would like to know more what i've

49:16

told you about now

49:18

is is of course the halftop methodology

49:20

in one project

49:21

but if you'd like to know more about how

49:23

you can train

49:24

and become certified in this subject

49:26

then we have

49:27

a whole concept related to this but if

49:30

you also would like to scale it into

49:32

more projects than just one

49:34

then we're just about to launch a half

49:36

double portfolio

49:38

concept which will help you to scale

49:40

this from one project into

49:42

many projects and we will actually do

49:45

a session in a few weeks i think it will

49:48

be

49:49

the uh 16th of june where we will

49:52

introduce

49:53

the half double portfolio at a webinar

49:56

as well

49:56

so you can sign up to this webinar

49:59

online if you would like to at half

50:00

double institute.org

50:02

but you can also sign up to the half

50:04

double research part

50:05

so if you would like to have more

50:07

knowledge about how were

50:08

the projects evaluated how was this

50:11

whole setup done

50:12

which is actually very inspiring in

50:14

terms of of creating a whole pmo setup

50:17

then please watch that session but you

50:19

can also hear more about the half double

50:20

certification standard and how you can

50:22

become a half double practitioner

50:24

which will be the session the 12th of

50:26

june so please feel free to

50:28

go into the event part of the site and

50:31

sign up for for some of the other

50:33

sessions

50:34

and if if you're uh curious about trying

50:36

this in your own project

50:38

then of course feel free to write me an

50:40

email ami ho

50:42

slash at the implement.dk

50:45

and and and then you we can have a a

50:48

dialogue about how to uh how to guide

50:50

you in the right direction

50:52

but now it is still nine minutes left

50:55

and i think we have time for a few

50:57

questions so i'm just gonna

50:59

have some help from anna here to help me

51:01

to uh she's probably

51:03

sorted out a few questions to start with

51:06

uh any suggestions the first

51:08

question from carson from a dbi

51:12

is what do you know about the value of

51:14

applying

51:15

a half double to small and medium

51:17

enterprises

51:18

okay so the first question what do we

51:21

know about the value of applying it to

51:23

small

51:23

medium enterprises i think that is a

51:25

brilliant question because this project

51:27

is funded by the danish industry

51:29

foundation

51:30

and they are of course very concerned

51:31

with the small medium enterprises which

51:33

we also are

51:34

and uh and i think that what we can say

51:37

about the methodology is

51:38

it is perfect for small medium

51:40

enterprise because it's simple

51:42

it's easy to to start up and most

51:45

leaders will understand you know their

51:48

role as a project owner and

51:50

and and it is also very value creating

51:53

from the start which is very essential

51:56

for

51:56

uh small medium enterprises but we also

51:59

have to say that the feedback that we

52:01

have received from

52:02

these companies when we work with them

52:04

is that the methodology even though it's

52:06

only nine things

52:07

tend to feel a little complicated to to

52:10

get started with

52:10

so when you see it first time and you

52:12

might see it in the background here

52:14

the methodology with the with the three

52:16

core elements and the nine

52:18

methods and tools then it seems hard to

52:20

cope with

52:21

so we're trying to make it even easier

52:24

to cope with

52:24

uh going forward would there be

52:28

another question from

52:39

ah so how does half double go hand in

52:41

hand with virtual project

52:43

projects thank you very much for asking

52:45

that question michael because

52:46

what we do when we set up our our uh our

52:50

co-location room which is which is what

52:53

we call the room where we all

52:54

meet and let's say every monday and

52:56

tuesday then we also set it up

52:58

as a physical room first of all but we

53:00

also set it up as a virtual room

53:02

so we make sure that everything is built

53:05

on a virtual platform

53:06

we like to use a platform called myro

53:09

which is the former

53:10

real time board we think it works pretty

53:12

nice because

53:13

you can put everything in there that you

53:15

like and you can design the wall

53:17

yourself so we like that tool however

53:20

there will be

53:20

a lot of other tools that you could use

53:22

but we tend to set it up in my row

53:24

and then we then we actually set up the

53:27

whole rhythm and key events of the

53:28

project saying

53:29

so for instance uh at least two times a

53:32

week

53:32

we meet in the room but if we have a

53:34

daily stand up then we just do that

53:36

online in a virtual space so we like to

53:39

mix

53:39

the setup so we have both personal

53:41

interaction and virtual

53:43

interaction meaning face to face and

53:44

virtual interaction

53:46

but sometimes and of course in these

53:48

corona times you cannot do the physical

53:50

interaction so in those cases we've made

53:52

it

53:53

purely virtual and we use the uh the

53:56

myro platform to do that and that has

53:58

worked out pretty well actually

54:01

yeah other questions we also

54:04

have a question from virtual the

54:07

principle

54:08

of creating a series of keys is clear

54:11

but as the skateboard to car

54:14

illustration shows

54:16

you can end up in a project with a lot

54:18

of rework as many of the mvps will be

54:21

distinct and not yeah

54:24

so the question here is if you if you

54:27

deliver an

54:28

mvp then you will do rework with the

54:30

next mv

54:31

with the next product that you will

54:32

deliver which is totally

54:34

correct you will you cannot be sure that

54:37

that

54:38

that you will that that you are not

54:40

doing rework

54:41

but but what we have at least discovered

54:43

is if you

54:44

if you because this is the drawback of

54:47

working with mvps

54:48

and we totally agree on on that but but

54:51

the

54:51

the big advantage here is that sometimes

54:54

when you set up the mvp

54:55

you gain so valuable feedback that you

54:58

figure out which features

54:59

are do you not have to do so so actually

55:03

in the chapter case what we figured out

55:04

was they start out with at least

55:06

50 features that they wanted to put into

55:09

their uh

55:10

headset product and we figured out that

55:12

once we've looked into it

55:13

that it was only five of them were

55:16

actually crucial

55:17

so we focus on those five and then we

55:19

only added another 20

55:21

and that was how the mvp worked in this

55:23

case that we

55:24

tested the five made sure that they

55:26

worked excellently

55:27

and then we added another 20 and then we

55:29

just left the other 25 out

55:31

because they were not important for

55:32

where the product was going in the

55:34

market

55:34

so so i agree that if you do not think

55:38

how can i say adjust it to the project

55:40

or thinking intelligently then you will

55:42

have rework yes

55:43

but the great thing is that you will

55:45

have great insights in what not to

55:46

deliver

55:47

when you do that so hopefully that can

55:49

balance it

55:51

other questions another question from

55:53

microscope is

55:55

he agrees that it's very important to

55:57

evolve the c level

55:58

but how do you do it and make sure that

56:01

they're only involved in the most

56:03

important projects okay so it's

56:06

important to

56:06

involve the c level but how do we do it

56:08

uh and and make sure that they're only

56:10

part of

56:11

of a few projects um so i think this

56:15

question actually uh

56:16

deserves you coming back at our

56:18

portfolio session because at the

56:19

portfolio session

56:21

we will give you some insights to how we

56:23

will set the pro

56:24

the whole portfolio up in short and fat

56:27

and short and fat actually means that

56:30

you will

56:31

do fewer projects at the same time but

56:33

you will execute them more

56:34

intensively so we actually have to put

56:37

quite a lot of projects on hold

56:39

so we work with the leadership team and

56:41

the c level to make sure that they make

56:43

the active decision to put quite a few

56:45

projects on hold

56:46

and then focus on only a few projects at

56:49

the same time

56:50

and we'll give you at least an approach

56:52

for how to do that but i very much agree

56:54

it is not easy because it is so hard

56:56

getting leadership committees to say no

56:58

to anything like it's so much easier to

57:00

say yes and just hope for the best

57:02

so it's a hard one

57:06

from chris his question is training and

57:09

certification

57:10

is it open for everyone also outside of

57:12

the northeast

57:13

yeah training and certification is it

57:15

open for everyone also outside the

57:17

nordics

57:17

yes it will be and we will launch it uh

57:21

i think in august we will launch it and

57:23

we will also launch it in a virtual

57:25

setup

57:25

we will also open up for uh partner

57:28

organizations to join in for this

57:29

so if you're a consultancy or an

57:32

education partner who like to

57:33

educate and have double then we also

57:35

have a train the trainer program that

57:37

you can join

57:38

and become a certified project a half

57:41

double institute trainer

57:42

so the answer is yes and if you want to

57:45

know more more specifically then please

57:47

send us an email at the institute

57:50

send me an email or info at half

57:53

halfdoubleinstitute.org

57:54

and we will help you in the right

57:56

direction

57:58

other questions yes it is from the food

58:01

industry

58:02

do you see this methodology also to

58:06

be applied and external sponsored

58:08

projects for example projects

58:10

which are greed and commercially defined

58:12

upfront

58:13

and contain physical yeah that is a

58:16

really great question in terms of

58:18

of you know how do you handle this when

58:20

it's not an internal project and it's

58:21

between two organizations and you have

58:23

contracts involved

58:24

and and let me be honest with you that

58:27

is a

58:28

a limitation for what is what is what it

58:30

is possible to do

58:32

but the thing is with the linux project

58:34

that was actually a collaboration

58:35

between linux and their

58:37

uh contractor called uh bile and

58:40

and they actually said okay we usually

58:42

would have a contract but we would set

58:44

it up with a lot of buffers

58:45

but let's join in together work on this

58:48

together and make the contract a little

58:49

more flexible

58:51

and and we will forgive each other if we

58:52

cannot deliver to the contract

58:54

specifically

58:55

but we will deliver on the overall you

58:57

know uh targets meaning we have to

58:59

develop this product

59:00

within this and that so so they actually

59:03

joined together on some overall

59:05

targets and that was how they actually

59:07

made the project

59:08

30 quicker because it took out all the

59:12

risk time or the buffer time that

59:13

they've put in from each side in order

59:15

to

59:16

deliver to each other so it can really

59:18

work

59:19

but it requires that that the two

59:21

parties

59:22

actually join together in a more

59:24

strategic partnership

59:25

or at least agree that they want to work

59:27

together on this so it can work but it's

59:30

but it will require them to agree on

59:31

that

59:33

i think uh time is up it is uh

59:36

one minute to 2 20. we will with the

59:39

great uh questions that you've answered

59:41

we'll try to

59:42

to answer some of them in in a question

59:45

or

59:47

in writing that is what i'm trying to

59:48

say so so you can you can see some of

59:51

the answers later on

59:52

and um and thank you so much for joining

59:55

in to this session

59:56

uh you are you i hope we will see you

59:59

for the coming

60:00

webinars have a great day out there and

60:03

have a great weekend when you get to

60:04

that

60:04

take care

Find more information about the Half Double Methodology  

See other Half Double Videos and Webinars on PortfolioResearch, Certifications and the partnership between Half Double and Global connect.